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ANT253H1_09FALL2_826 - oader ID 14396 Down load er ID 1439...

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ANT 253 H1F Language and Society Test 2 (1 December 2009) — VERSION A 1 FAMILY NAME GIVEN NAME STUDENT ID# E-MAIL ADDRESS TOTAL: /25 All of the following questions are based on the material covered in chapters 5, 6, 8, and 9 of the course textbook. Please clearly circle your answer in ink. If you use pencil, you will not be permitted to contest your mark, even if an arithmetic error was made in its calculation. Good luck! Indicate whether questions 1 through 12 are true or false by clearly circling your answer: 1. T F While the modern English words candid and fair are synonymous, the former is derived from Latin and the latter is derived from Old English. [pp. 189-190] 2. T F In Roman mythology, the Trojan prince Aeneas escapes the destruction of Troy with a band of survivors and sails westward to erect a new city that, generations later, would ultimately become Rome. For this reason, Aeneas is an example of a culture hero. [Culture heroes have to discover a cultural artifact or technological process, p. 151] 3. T F In Dell Hymes’ typology of discourse-shaping variables (acronymically known as ‘SPEAKING’), the letter ‘I’ stands for ‘iconicity,’ or the way in which the social status of the interlocutor informs the surface structure of the utterance. [It stands for ‘instrumentalities’ (the dialect or linguistic variety used by the speech community, p. 144] 4. T F In William Labov’s landmark research on the relationship between the pronunciation of / r / and upward social mobility, it was found that rates of pronunciation of / r / were lowest in upscale department stores and highest in low-income neighbourhoods. [See pp. 120-121] 5. T F The Volapuk language was devised in 1679 by the German priest Johann Martin Schleyer. [Schleyer devised it in 1879, p. 133] 6. T F Erving Goffman has observed that speakers regularly refrain from saying what they mean in many situations in the service of the higher goal of politeness in its broadest sense. For example, a person may respond to the query “How are you?” with “Fine, thanks,” even if she is having a terrible day. [This observation is Robin Lakoff’s, p. 140] 7. T F In Western onomastics, given names commonly have Greek, Teutonic, Latin, or Hebrew origins. [See pp. 127-128] 8. T F Edward Sapir’s ethnological research on the Kwakiutl language revealed that the three basic verb tense categories of Standard Average European (SAE) are not universal. An example of this finding is that the tendency of English speakers to conceptualize the passage of time as a linear and irreversible flow of events is not shared by speakers of Italian. [English and Italian are both SAE languages, pp. 205-206] 9. T F The extinct Cayuse language is a lingua franca of the contemporary Western world. [The question tests students’ understanding of the concept of a lingua franca, which by definition cannot be extinct, p. 134] 10. T F In Roman Jakobson’s typology of “constituents that must be present before language can be used in social settings,” the mode of contact
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