ANT253H1_09FALL2_826

ANT253H1_09FALL2_826 - oader ID: 14396 Down load er ID:...

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Unformatted text preview: oader ID: 14396 Down load er ID: 1439 6 Downl ANT 253 H1F Language and Society Test 2 (1 December 2009) — VERSION A Dow nlo ade r ID: 143 96 FAMILY NAME GIVEN NAME STUDENT ID# Tes t ID: E-MAIL ADDRESS 96 143 r ID: ade nlo Dow TOTAL: /25 Test ID: 2087 Dow All of the following questions are based on the material covered in chapters 5, 6, 8, and 9 of the course textbook. Please clearly circle your answer in ink. If you use pencil, you will not be permitted to contest your mark, even if an arithmetic error was made in its calculation. Good luck! r ID: ade nlo Te st ID 96 143 ID: : 20 87 2087 Test Indicate whether questions 1 through 12 are true or false by clearly circling your answer: 87 Downloader ID: 14396 T F While the modern English words candid and fair are synonymous, the former is derived from Latin and the latter is derived from Old English. [pp. 189-190] 2. T F In Roman mythology, the Trojan prince Aeneas escapes the destruction of Troy with a band of survivors and sails westward to erect a new city that, generations later, would ultimately become Rome. For this reason, Aeneas is an example of a culture hero. [Culture heroes have to discover a cultural artifact or technological process, p. 151] 3. T F In Dell Hymes’ typology of discourse-shaping variables (acronymically known as ‘SPEAKING’), the letter ‘I’ stands for ‘iconicity,’ or the way in which the social status of the interlocutor informs the surface structure of the utterance. [It stands for ‘instrumentalities’ (the dialect or linguistic variety used by the speech community, p. 144] wn Do Downloader ID: 14396 : 14 39 6 Te st ID : 20 1. er ad ID lo : ID nlo ade r ID: 143 96 Test 4. T F ID: 2087 Tes t ID: 208 7 Do Test ID: 2087 wn lo ad e r 6 39 14 Dow In William Labov’s landmark research on the relationship between the pronunciation of /r/ and upward social mobility, it was found that rates of pronunciation of /r/ were lowest in upscale department stores and highest in low-income neighbourhoods. [See pp. 120-121] 6 er ID: 87 Down 1439 87 20 : load ID st Te Down load er ID: 1439 20 6 The Volapuk language was devised in 1679 by the German priest Johann Martin Schleyer. [Schleyer devised it in 1879, p. 133] : F ID 208 7 wn lo ad er ID : 14 Te 6 39 Erving Goffman has observed that speakers regularly refrain from saying what they mean in many situations in the service of the higher goal of politeness in its broadest sense. For example, a person may respond to the query “How are you?” with “Fine, thanks,” even if she is having a terrible day. [This observation is Robin Lakoff’s, p. 140] 39 F ID : 14 T t ID: Do 6. Tes 6 T st 5. 87 : 20 ID ad e r st Te T F In Western onomastics, given names commonly have Greek, Teutonic, Latin, or Hebrew origins. [See pp. 127-128] 8. T F Edward Sapir’s ethnological research on the Kwakiutl language revealed that the three basic verb tense categories of Standard Average European (SAE) are not universal. An example of this finding is that the tendency of English speakers to conceptualize the passage of time as a linear and irreversible flow of events is not shared by speakers of Italian. [English and Italian are both SAE languages, pp. 205-206] 9. T Do wn lo 7. F Down load er ID: Test ID: 2087 208 Tes 1439 6 7 t ID: The extinct Cayuse language is a lingua franca of the contemporary Western world. [The question tests students’ understanding of the concept of a lingua franca, which by definition cannot be extinct, p. 134] Downloader ID: 14396 6 39 : 14 ID ad er lo Do wn 10. T F In Roman Jakobson’s typology of “constituents that must be present before language can be used in social settings,” the mode of contact refers to the medium through which addressee and addresser exchange linguistic cues (e.g. face to face, online, over the telephone). [p. 145] 11. T F The first dialect atlas in the Western world was entitled Atlas linguistique, and was authored by the Oxdia @ http://www.oxdia.com This item is shared by the uploader to help you in your studies. 14396 der ID: Downloa It is copyrighted by the creator (copyright owner) of the content. Test ID: 2087 Distribution is prohibited without permission from the copyright owner. Solution (if any) is NOT audited, so use at your discretion. Downlo ader ID: 14396 1 : ID Te st 87 20 : ID st Te Downloader ID: 14396 ANT 253 H1F Language and Society Test 2 (1 December 2009) — VERSION A German schoolteacher Georg Wenker in 1876. [This atlas was actually entitled Sprachatlas des Deutschen Reichs, p. 177] Test ID: 2087 12. T F In response to criticism, Paul says, “Look, you don’t understand—put yourself in my shoes for a second. Do you think you could have made a better decision?” This is an example of situational focusing. [pp. 141-142] Gavin is taking a course on the microbiology of plants. One of his assignments is to write a formal lab report on an experiment that he conducted with some classmates. He begins his written report with the following paragraph. Carefully consider this paragraph and then answer questions 13 to 16 based on its content: Te st 20 87 We tried to calibrate the electrode unit in order to measure the rate of photosynthetic oxygen production in our microphyte sample, but it didn’t work, and I became enraged. After finally—finally!— calibrating the electrode, we sat around for 20 minutes waiting for the results. I was bored out of my frickin’ mind. Don’t tell him I said anything, but Matt O’Brien almost sabotaged the whole project when he nearly sneezed on the sample. Good thing I pushed him away—he went flying and ended up crushing my lunchbox instead. Whatever. All I had in there was some leftover dim sum. 87 : 20 ID Te Te st ID : 20 st 87 6 39 : 14 ID 13. er ad The above paragraph does NOT contain an example of which of the following? lo wn Do loanword cataphoric device toponym [p. 130] jargon The above paragraph contains examples of all of the above. oader ID: 14396 st Te 39 6 Downl : ID st ID : 20 87 ID r ad e : ID wn lo 6 39 14 Gavin’s writing style violates a key convention of formal scientific writing. Which of the below statements most accurately characterizes this convention, as described in the course text? Do 14. Te : 87 20 er ad lo wn Do a. b. c. d. e. 14 Te st ID : 20 87 ID : Dow nl oa de r ID : 6 39 14 : ID er ad lo wn Do a. Sentences in scientific discourse should rarely, if ever, contain compound predicates. b. Academic publications should always begin with an abstract that provides a brief synopsis of the motivating research question, methodology, results, and implications for other researchers. c. In scientific writing, passive sentences should be deployed to downplay the role of the subject-actor and highlight the role of the object-goal. [see pp. 121-122] d. Sources should be cited using authors’ last names wherever possible in order to identify them as credentialed members of the research community (e.g. “Peterson 2009”). 14 39 6 ID : 20 87 Test ID: 2087 st 7 ID: 39 ader 14396 14 t ID: 6 Te 208 Tes Downlo Do wn lo ad er : 14 39 6 ID : ID Which of the basic language functions described by Roman Jakobson is most closely served by Gavin’s expressions of rage and impatience? the phatic function the metalingual function the poetic function the emotive function [p. 145] Do a. b. c. d. wn lo ad e r 15. 6 39 14 : ID er ad lo wn Do Dow nlo ade r ID: 143 16. 96 Which of the below statements is TRUE, based on the above data? a. b. c. d. er ad lo wn Do : ID Gavin is a prolific user of tag questions. Of the five chief linguistic subcompetencies described in the textbook, Gavin has failed to demonstrate only one—namely, phonological competence. [The reason is that it’s a written lab report, p. 146] The dialect utilized in this lab report and the dialect that’s traditionally employed in scientific papers are not mutually intelligible. Gavin’s description of what happened to his lab partner (“he went flying”) is an illustration of Bronislaw Malinowski’s concept of phatic communion. None of the above statements are true. 6 39 14 e. Oxdia @ http://www.oxdia.com This item is shared by the uploader to help you in your studies. It is copyrighted by the creator (copyright owner) of the content. Distribution is prohibited without permission from the copyright owner. Solution (if any) is NOT audited, so use at your discretion. Test ID: 2087 2 ID: 14396 Downloader 6 39 14 : ID er ad lo wn Do 20 : ID st Te er ad lo wn Do ID w Do : 6 39 14 208 Tes 39 : 7 t ID: 6 14 ID ANT 253 H1F Language and Society Test 2 (1 December 2009) — VERSION A er ad lo wn Do : 39 14 6 Circle the best answer to each of the following questions (questions 17 to 20): ID er ad lo wn Do 17. Which of the below statements is FALSE? 87 20 : ID st Te a. In an imaginary language, the word for the English verb “sleep” is /dorma/ among men, but /duarmo/ among women. This is an example of a gender-coded doublet. [p. 116] b. In Roman Jakobson’s typology of language functions, the exclamation “Don’t touch that!” would have the conative function of startling the listener and deterring her/him from touching a particular object. [p. 145] c. Stephan is learning to speak Spanish. He notices that Spanish nouns are gendered, and that many nouns that are associated with intelligence are feminine, such as “cabeza” (“head”), “intelectualidad” (“intelligentsia”), and “agudeza” (“shrewdness”). These are examples of Jungian archetypes. [p. 154] Do wn lo ad er ID : 14 39 6 d. Neve has just been elected Chairman of the Department of Linguistics at a particular university. His first executive act is to eliminate the gendered terminology of his position, and to title himself the “Chair” rather the “Chairman” in order to discourage the acceptability of androcentric vocabulary (i.e. vocabulary that treats maleness as the default gender for positions of authority). This is an example of linguistic activism. [p. 119] 87 ID : 20 20 87 st Te Te st : ID : 20 87 7 t ID: 208 Te st ID Tes Marcel Danesi observes that in Western society “the high premium that we put on identifying women by their relationship (past or present) with men” is evident in a variety of social and linguistic phenomena. Which of the following scenarios is NOT an illustration of this observation? [pp. 117-120] 20 87 ID : 2087 st ID: r wn lo Do Do wn lo ad er ID : 14 39 6 ad e 2087 Test ID: Hestia is getting married. The text in her wedding invitations reads, “Mr. and Mrs. David Richards cordially invite you to the wedding ceremony of their daughter, Hestia.” wn lo a. Test Te ID : 14 39 6 18. ad er ID : b. Cassidy, Drew, and Jamie are trying to set up a knitting club. In order to recruit members, they post an online advertisement inviting potential participants to meet at a local café. When everyone arrives, they’re astounded to discover that Cassidy, Drew, and Jamie are all men. c. Irene has just published a book on astrophysics. The dedication page reads, “To my wonderful mother, Alyssa Keller (née Robin), who taught me to shoot for the stars.” Her use of the French word “née,” which means “born,” indicates that her mother was named “Alyssa Robin” at birth and later adopted her husband’s last name to become “Alyssa Keller.” d. Ophelia, a mechanic, is planning to purchase a new car. She has been visiting dealerships to investigate options, and notices that the salesmen tend to instinctively “dumb down” technical discussions when speaking to her. To her frustration and amusement, they also routinely ask her if she has a boyfriend, father, or brother whom she plans to consult before making a final decision. 6 6 14 39 Te st ID : 20 87 Do 14 39 wn lo In an imaginary language, the form /galija/ means “light fog,” the form /prodik/ means “thick, opaque fog,” the form /relibu/ means “fog accompanied by rain,” and the form /jeyavo/ means “cool, morning fog.” In light of this data, which of the following statements is FALSE? [pp. 197-199, chapter 9 passim] st Te Do 19. ad e r ID : Test ID: 2087 : ID 87 20 Do wn lo ad er ID : 14 39 6 a. Franz Boas would say that the vocabulary of this language strongly suggests that fog historically played (and possibly continues to play) a critical role in the cultural life of its speakers, and that the development of this language probably took place within an environment with a very foggy climate. b. English uses fewer lexical categories to refer to all of these phenomena than this language does. This language thus uses a larger specialized vocabulary to encode various ‘fog modalities’ than English. Test ID: 2087 c. Benjamin Whorf would say that because language preconditions perception, and predisposes speakers to particular classifications for natural phenomena, English speakers who try to learn this language may find it difficult to develop facility with its many expressions for “fog” because they will not intuitively perceive meaningful differences between all of these types of fog. Downlo ader ID: 14396 st Te : ID 20 87 Oxdia @ http://www.oxdia.com 3 This item is shared by the uploader to help you in your studies. It is copyrighted by the creator (copyright owner) of the content. Test ID: 2087 Distribution is prohibited without permission from the copyright owner. Solution (if any) is NOT audited, so use at your discretion. Downlo ader ID: 14396 87 6 1439 load er ID: 20 87 ID : Down st Te Te st ID : 20 87 96 143 r ID: ade nlo Te st ID : 20 87 Te st ID : 20 87 Dow ANT 253 H1F Language and Society Test 2 (1 December 2009) — VERSION A d. Emile Durkheim would say that the myths of this speech community will have arisen from its experience with extraordinary manifestations of fog (and possibly other meteorological phenomena such as storms, thunder, moonlight, etc) and its members’ subsequent attempts to explain fog by personifying it. [This is part of an unrelated discussion on pp. 154-155, and also not an accurate description of Durkheim’s views.] 6 39 6 39 er ad : ID : 14 lo wn Do : ID 20. 14 ID er ad lo wn Do 87 20 st In an imaginary language, only four distinct colours are recognized with specific names: /negriv/ (“black”), /blankes/ (“white”), /saffre/ (“yellow”), and /verdio/ (“greenish blue”). If Paul Kay had been presented with this data during their research on cross-cultural colour vocabularies in 1975, he would have been deeply concerned. Why? [pp. 211-212 — In Berlin and Kay’s theory, a four-colour language would have terms for black, white, red, and either grue (green, blue, or green-blue, which Kay added in 1975) or yellow.] Te Download er ID: 14396 Te st ID : 20 Downloader ID: 14396 87 Do wn lo ad er : ID 14 6 39 Test ID: 2087 a. It would have undermined one of his hypotheses: that if a language had four colours, it would have a term for either yellow or grue, but not both. b. It would have falsified his hypothesis that the lexical recognition of brown always precedes orange, which is—after all, just a mix of yellow and red. c. It would have undermined one of his hypotheses: that if a language had four colours, three of them would necessarily have to be black, white, and red. d. Both (a) and (b) e. Both (a) and (c) f. None of the above. Te st Test ID: 2087 20 87 6 39 14 : Do wn lo ad e r ID Te st ID : 20 87 ID : Consider the following dialogue, and then indicate whether questions 21 through 25 are true or false by clearly circling your answer. In the below questions, the word “line” does not mean “sentence”—it refers to any given portion of the conversation where one person has the floor and the other person is listening. Downloader ID: 14396 nlo 87 Dow ade r ID: 20 96 143 You’ll never guess what happened to me today. I was visiting my aunt in the hospital, and this male nurse comes up to me, and he’s, like, carrying all these boxes, and then he says— Just a second. If the nurse had been a woman, would you have said, “This female nurse comes up to me?” No, of course not. Look, can I finish? This male nurse—sorry, this nurse comes up to me carrying all these boxes, and he says, “Excuse me, could you please move aside.” Can you believe that? Well, yes. Were you blocking him? You know what? You’re no fun to talk to. Have you started writing your essay yet? Eh, sort of. I have some ideas outlined, but I don’t have a main argument yet. Ha! Guess what? I’m already finished. I told you I’d finish ahead of you! Wasn’t I right? You’re always right, Henry. You’re always right. ID : Henry: : 87 20 ID st ad e Te 6 er ID: 14 14396 ID : Abdallah: Henry: Abdallah: Henry: Abdallah: ID: r ader 39 Downlo Henry: 6 Te st Abdallah: 1439 load Do wn lo Down 21. T F Henry’s solicitation of information from Abdallah (“Have you started writing your essay yet?”) fulfills a heuristic function. [p. 147] 22. T F Henry’s first line contains an example of a hesitancy device. [p. 181] 23. T F Abdallah has noticed that Henry’s phrase “this male nurse” presupposes that nurses, unless otherwise indicated, are automatically female. This is an illustration of markedness theory. [pp. 117-119] Downloader ID: 14396 24. T F Abdallah’s last line contains a hedge. [p. 139] 25. T F Henry’s second line contains a conversational gambit. [p. 137 — a repair is a conversational gambit.] Oxdia @ http://www.oxdia.com Dow nlo ade r ID: 143 96 This item is shared by the uploader to help you in your studies. It is copyrighted by the creator (copyright owner) of the content. Distribution is prohibited without permission from the copyright owner. Solution (if any) is NOT audited, so use at your discretion. Te st ID : 20 87 4 ...
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