Lecture+16-1-1 - Psychology II Lecture 16 : Lecture Points...

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Psychology II Lecture 16 :
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Lecture Points Where does intelligence come from? Intelligence and Performance
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Where does Intelligence Come From? Genetic Influences Environmental Influences Gene x Environment Interactions
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Genetic Influences on Intelligence Galton (1822- 1911): among the first studies of genealogical intelligence; argued intelligence is inherited
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Genetic Influences Flaws in Galton’s approach? Why aren’t correlations of intelligence among siblings enough to support the hereditability of intelligence?
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Genetic Influences Compare people who share genes, but not a common environment (e.g., twins or siblings raised apart) vs. people who are a common environment, but not genes (e.g., step- or adoptive siblings living
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Genetic Influences
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Genetic Influences - Intelligence test scores of identical twins strongly correlated when raised in the same household, but also when raised in different households - Intelligence test scores of unrelated siblings in the same household only modestly correlated
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Genetic Influences on Intelligence
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Genetic Influences: Hereditability - The hereditability of intelligence has been estimated to be approximately 50% - This does NOT mean: 50% of intelligence is due to genes; 50% is due to environment - Hereditability coefficient: for people in a particular group , the proportion of the difference between scores that can be explained by differences in their genes
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Genetic Influences: Hereditability Example: Intelligence is more hereditable in wealthy than poor neighborhoods. The hereditability of intelligence among wealthy children is approx 0.72, but approximately .10 among poor children (Turkheimer et al., 2003) Because wealthy children may share fairly similar environments/experiences, any differences between them may be due largely to their genes Poorer children may have more variation in their environments/experience, thus, differences in their intelligence may be due
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Genetic Influences: Hereditability Example (2): The hereditability of height among white men is approximately .8, with average height of 5’ 10”. “If we meet a white man in the street who is 6’ tall, we can assume that 80% of the extra two inches (1.6 inches) is due to genes, while .4 inches is due to environmental effects such as nutrition.” (from Lai, 2006)
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Genetic Influences: Hereditability Example (3) In a world of clones (everyone is genetically identical), then hereditability of intelligence would be _____ because all differences would be due to differences in their environment/experience.
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Where does Intelligence Come From?
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course CHEMISTRY 1a taught by Professor Nitsche during the Fall '11 term at Southwestern.

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Lecture+16-1-1 - Psychology II Lecture 16 : Lecture Points...

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