Lecture+23+_Development_-2

Lecture+23+_Development_-2 - Psychology II Lecture 23 :...

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Psychology II Lecture 23 : Social
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Infants’ signals attract the attention of caregivers
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Social Development Attachment: the emotional bond that forms between newborns and their primary caregivers ( secure, insecure: avoidant, ambivalent, disorganized attachment styles)
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Foundations of Attachment Harlow (1905-1981): attachment experiments with baby rhesus monkeys.
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Foundations of Attachment Monkeys chose terry cloth monkey that provided no food over wire monkey that provided food. Monkeys reared in isolation for first 6 months of life suffered permanent psychosocial effects (social interactions, impaired parenting behaviors)
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Foundations of Attachment Bowlby argued that infants innately channel signals to primary caregivers to form attachment The person who responds most often/promptly becomes the infant’s emotional center
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Foundations of Attachment: The Internal Working Model Infant keeps track of the responsiveness/availability of the primary caregiver, and is forming an internal working model of relationships Internal Working Model: a set of beliefs about the self, the primary caregiver, and the relationship between them
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Foundations of Attachment Attachment theory suggests that children who experience supportive/responsive care will develop a secure attachment, see themselves as lovable, and see others as caring, and develop a positive internal working model Children who experience unresponsive, inconsistent,
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Support for Internal Working Models (Johnson, Dweck, & Chen, 2007) Hypothesis: Infants with secure internal working models should be surprised by events that show unresponsive caregivers; infants with insecure internal working models should be surprised by events that show responsive caregivers Showed abstract cartoons of responsive and unresponsive caregivers to secure and insecurely attached infants; measured looking time Infants will show longer looking time at unexpected events
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Support for Internal Working Models (Johnson, Dweck, & Chen, 2007) Hypothesis: Infants with secure internal working models should be surprised by events that show unresponsive caregivers; infants with insecure internal working models should be surprised by events that show responsive caregivers Showed abstract cartoons of responsive and unresponsive caregivers to secure and insecurely attached infants; measured looking time Infants will show longer looking time at unexpected events
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Support for Internal Working Models (Johnson, Dweck, & Chen, 2007)
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Memory Hypothesis: Children should pay more attention to, and thus remember events consistent with their internal working models Infants assessed for attachment security at age 1; classified as secure or insecure At 3 years old, children showed a puppet show including happy events (e.g., puppet received a present) or unhappy events (e.g., puppet spills drink). Children tested on which events they
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course CHEMISTRY 1a taught by Professor Nitsche during the Fall '11 term at Southwestern.

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Lecture+23+_Development_-2 - Psychology II Lecture 23 :...

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