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CHM144L-EXPERIMENT 3-FINAL REPORT - EXPERIMENT#3 COLOGNE...

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EXPERIMENT #3: COLOGNE MAKING Dampil, Dianne T. Professor Medarlo De Jesus, School of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry and Biotechnology, Mapua Institute of Technology; Dampil, Dianne T., CHM144L/A21, School of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry and Biotechnology, Mapua Institute of Technology INTRODUCTION Cologne is a lesser concentration of perfume that originated in Germany in the 16th century. The term "eau de cologne" is technically a specific fragrance. However, outside of Germany, it has become generically used to describe a scented formula containing essential oils and used as a toiletry. The first cologne was sold in 1709 by Giovanni Maria Farina, an Italian perfumer originally from Italy. He named the new perfume "Eau de cologne" after his new hometown of Cologne, Germany. The term was later shortened to simply "cologne." Farina's formula has continued to be manufactured in Germany and is still held as a closely guarded secret today. Cologne is a term given to a fragrance similar to perfume, but is used by men. Women may also use cologne but it is typically associated with male use. It is used to give the body or surroundings a pleasant smell. Cologne contains a mixture of citrus oils including lemon, lime, orange, neroli and tangerine in an ethanol base. The base is typically 70 to 90% alcohol. It can also contain oils of jasmine, lavender, rosemary and thyme but the official formula is dependent upon the individual brand and manufacturer. There are three main types of cologne. Eau de cologne has a mild, long-lasting scent. Eau de toilette has the lightest scent but is also the longest lasting. Cologne, without the "eau de," is the most common type and has a heavy scent that doesn't last long. Among these types, there are hundreds of brands of cologne. Some of the most popular include Old Spice, Stetson and Aqua Velva. Many people confuse eau de cologne with eau de toilette. The difference between these two, aside from the scent and longevity, is the content. Eau de cologne contains approximately 3 to 8% aromatic compounds mixed in an alcohol base. Eau de toilette contains around 5 to 15% aromatic compounds mixed in an alcohol or water base. METHODOLOGY Apparatus Graduated cylinder 50mL and250 ml beaker Dropper Stirring rod Hot plate Small bottles Chemicals and Procedure COLOGNE FORMULATION
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Cologne Formulation Wt. alcohol (g) Wt. essential oil (g) Wt. water (g) C-1 30g 1.5g 18.25g C-2 20g 1.5g 28.25g C-3 30g 1g 18.75g I.
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