bus law db1 - Part of the First Amendment to the...

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Part of the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States says that Congress shall make no laws abridging the freedom of speech. However, there are laws that prohibit the use of certain offensive language on television. How can such laws exist in view of the First Amendment protection of freedom of speech? If Congress and the Courts can ignore the specific language of the Constitution as to free speech, can they ignore other parts of the Constitution? This is not a question of whether there should be censorship, but rather a question of how there can be laws that censor speech in view of the Constitutional provision that guarantees free speech. The First Amendment literally states that you have the right to say what you want, whenever you want to. Taken in that context, it would seem that the government is censoring US citizens and denying them their basic freedoms. If you examine the Amendment a little further however, you will see that it specifies where you have the right to exercise those freedoms.
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course BUL 329213 taught by Professor Singletary during the Spring '11 term at Florida State College.

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