HS201 - (2) Tools For Healthy Eating

HS201 - (2) Tools For Healthy Eating - Tools for Healthy...

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Tools for Healthy Eating Professor Joan Salge Blake, MS, RD, LDN
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Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine Specific reference value for vitamins, minerals, and macronutrients Based on an individual’s age and gender.
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Dietary Guidelines for Americans , 2010 Dietary and lifestyle recommendations for healthy individuals over the age of 2 to maintain good health and prevent and reduce diet-related chronic diseases.
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A Food Guidance System
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Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI): a set of reference values for the essential nutrients needed to maintain good health , to prevent chronic diseases , and to avoid unhealthy excesses .
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Sound Nutrition Research Begins with the Scientific Method Figure 1.4
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Controlled Experiments: Scientists use experimental research to test hypotheses. Figure 1.6
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A Hypothesis Can Lead to a Scientific Consensus Figure 1.5
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Figure 2.1
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DRI Terms Estimated average requirement (EAR): the amount of a nutrient that is estimated to meet the requirement for the nutrient in half of the people of a specific age and gender group. The EAR is used in setting the RDA. Recommended dietary allowance (RDA): the average daily amount of a nutrient that is sufficient to meet the nutrient needs of nearly all (97–98%) healthy individuals of a specific age and gender group. Adequate intake (AI): the average amount of a nutrient that appears to be adequate for individuals when there is not sufficient scientific research to calculate an RDA. The AI exceeds the EAR and possibly the RDA.
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DRI TERMS Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL): the maximum amount of a nutrient that can be consumed daily without harm in a similar age and gender group. The UL is not intended to be a recommended level of intake.
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Figure 2.2
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DRIs Encompass Several Reference Values: Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges (AMDR): Recommended ranges of intakes for energy- containing nutrients Carbohydrates: 45-65% of daily caloric intake Fat: 20-35% of daily caloric intake Proteins: 10-35% of daily caloric intake
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Table 2.1
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Dietary Guidelines for Americans , 2010 Science-based recommendations for health promotion and chronic disease prevention
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Four Major Action Themes in the Report: 1.Reduce the incidence of overweight and obesity by reducing calories; 2.Shift food intake patterns to a more plant-based diet, emphasizing vegetables,
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course SAR HS HS 201 taught by Professor Salge-blake during the Spring '11 term at BU.

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HS201 - (2) Tools For Healthy Eating - Tools for Healthy...

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