Transition Metal Chemistry and Paper Chromatography - Experiment

Transition Metal Chemistry and Paper Chromatography - Experiment

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Curtis Franks 8AM 112-501 3/09/11 Transition Metal Chemistry and Paper Chromatography 3/01/11 Introduction Humanities’ abundant use of metals in the widest range of industries has produced high concentrations of pollutant metals, found worldwide. Unlike organic pollutants, metals pollutants are not biodegradable and accumulate. Understanding the reactivity of these pollutant metals helps our understanding of that metals impacts on different environments. The soil conditions within each environment largely determine the bioavailability of a metal pollutant. A metal may remain in the soil or become mobile depending on the pH, presence of other ions, or organic matter within the pollutant’s environment. Mobile metals can work their way through the soil and into the food chain through movement into water and plant matter. Understanding the risks of these pollutants requires an understanding of their mobility. Materials and Methods 2 pieces of chromatography paper 2 600 mL beakers Beaker for collecting waste 2 large watch glasses 1 spot plate tongs capillary tubes ruler pencil First, four observations were performed on each of five transition metal solutions. Changes that occurred after the addition of HCl, NH 3 , and dimethylglyoxime to aqueous solutions of each metal were noted. The five transition metal cations used were Fe 3+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ . Preparation for this portion of the experiment involved 1 drop of each of the five transition metal cation solutions in separate spots on the spot plate. The color of each cation solution was noted. Then 2-3 drops of 3M HCl was added to each drop on the spot plate. Each of the five solutions was observed and changes were noted. The spot plate was then cleaned off with distilled water into a waste beaker.
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course CHEM 101 taught by Professor Williamson during the Spring '08 term at Texas A&M.

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Transition Metal Chemistry and Paper Chromatography - Experiment

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