Lab%204%20-%20Activity%20Diagrams

Lab%204%20-%20Activity%20Diagrams - LAB 4 ACTIVITY DIAGRAMS...

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L AB 4 A CTIVITY D IAGRAMS ACTIVITY DIAGRAM NOTATIONS Activity diagrams are tools used to model workflow, business process, and procedural logic. As such, one of their uses is to graphically model a use case narrative. Below are the major notational symbols for an activity diagram: Name Shape Use Initial node Represents the start of the process. Normally placed in the top and/or left of activity diagram. Action Represents individual steps in sequence. Actions should be named with a verb followed by the object of the verb's action. Flow Represents the sequence of actions. Most flows do not need words to identify them. Decision Represents a decision point. Has one incoming flow and two or more outgoing flows. The outgoing flows should use words in brackets [] to identify the conditions under which that flow is taken. Merge Represents the combining of two or more flows previously separated. Has multiple incoming flows and one outgoing flow. Does not need words to identify the flows. Fork Has one incoming flow and multiple outgoing flows. The outgoing flows represent actions that can occur in any order or concurrently. CNIT 180: Lab 4 – Activity Diagrams Page 1
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Has multiple incoming flows and one outgoing flows. Represents the end of concurrent processing begun by a fork. All flows coming into the join must be completed before processing can continue. Activity Final Represents the conclusion of the process. Normally placed in the bottom and/or right of the activity diagram. The activity diagram below for the final steps of an e-commerce transaction use all of the above notations. Talk through the logic that is documented in the diagram. PARTITIONS The above activity diagram shows you what happens, but it does not tell you who does what. To do that you need to draw the activity diagram with partitions. Partitions, sometimes called swim lanes, are used to divide the activity diagram into areas for each relevant actor or object class. Whether or not you use partitions depends on what you are trying to document with the activity
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2012 for the course CNIT 180 taught by Professor Victorbarlow during the Spring '12 term at Purdue.

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Lab%204%20-%20Activity%20Diagrams - LAB 4 ACTIVITY DIAGRAMS...

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