Ch11-Heat Exchangers

Ch11-Heat Exchangers - One Shell Pass, Two Tube Passes Two...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–21. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 Heat Exchangers
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Car Radiator Air conditioning
Background image of page 2
Heat Exchanger Types Heat exchangers are ubiquitous to energy conversion and utilization. They involve heat exchange between two fluids separated by a solid and encompass a wide range of flow configurations. Concentric-Tube Heat Exchangers Parallel Flow Counterflow Simplest configuration Superior performance associated with counter flow
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cross-flow Heat Exchangers Finned-Both Fluids Unmixed Unfinned-One Fluid Mixed the Other Unmixed For cross-flow over the tubes, fluid motion, and hence mixing, in the transverse direction ( y ) is prevented for the finned tubes, but occurs for the unfinned condition. Heat exchanger performance is influenced by mixing.
Background image of page 4
Shell-and-Tube Heat Exchangers One Shell Pass and One Tube Pass Baffles are used to establish a cross-flow and to induce turbulent mixing of the shell-side fluid, both of which enhance convection. The number of tube and shell passes may be varied, e.g.:
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 12
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 14
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 16
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 18
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 20
Background image of page 21
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: One Shell Pass, Two Tube Passes Two Shell Passes, Four Tube Passes Compact Heat Exchangers Widely used to achieve large heat rates per unit volume, particularly when one or both fluids is a gas. Characterized by large heat transfer surface areas per unit volume, small flow passages, and laminar flow. (a) Fin-tube (flat tubes, continuous plate fins) (b) Fin-tube (circular tubes, continuous plate fins) (c) Fin-tube (circular tubes, circular fins) (d) Plate-fin (single pass) (e) Plate-fin (multipass) Parallel Flow Counterflow Special Operating Conditions Case (a): C h >>C c or h is a condensing vapor ( 29 . h C Negligible or no change in ( 29 , , . h h o h i T T T = Case (b): C c >>C h or c is an evaporating liquid ( 29 . c C Negligible or no change in ( 29 , , . c c o c i T T T = Case (c): C h =C c . 1 2 1 m T T T = =...
View Full Document

Page1 / 21

Ch11-Heat Exchangers - One Shell Pass, Two Tube Passes Two...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 21. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online