f_0019741_16817

f_0019741_16817 - The Relations between Central Asian...

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Alternatives: Turkish Journal of International Relations, Vol. 8, No. 3, Fall 2009 1 The Relations between Central Asian States and United States, China and Russian within the Framework of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization Ezeli Azarkan * Abstract This paper will examine the development of United States (U.S.), Chinese and Russian presence in Central Asia since the 1990s and the Central Asian states’ response to their actions. Also, it will discuss whether the Central Asian states joined the The Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) merely to appease their powerful neighbors China and Russia or whether these small states have had an impact on the SCO, its agenda and direction. Introduction The purpose of this paper is to study further the interests and relations of the Central Asian states with the major powers seeking influence in the region – China, Russia and the United States, to explore whether the relationship of the Central Asian states with Russia and China prevent them from developing into true democratic states, with free and fair elections, rule of law, basic human rights and freedoms, and whether the SCO agenda in Central Asia complements or contradicts U.S. policy in the region. It may appear that the Central Asian states, which are comparatively small and poor, are merely bandwagoning with the much more powerful members: China and Russia. Indeed, as geopolitics and geo-economics play a role in the triangle of Russia, China, and U.S. relations, the Central Asian states have certain bargaining power and have been balancing the three major powers effectively.
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Alternatives: Turkish Journal of International Relations, Vol. 8, No. 3, Fall 2009 2 Significance of the Central Asian Region It is evident from the economic overview that neither Central Asia’s population, of about fifty five million people, nor its economic capacity, with a total GDP of about $62.43 billion, represents a considerable impact on the world. However, its energy resources are clearly significant and its location is strategically important. Located at the center of Eurasia on the intersection of critical transport routes, Central Asia represents a strategic component of the Eurasian continent. These four former Soviet republics of Central Asia serve as a bridge between East and West. 1 As a special report from The Economist noted: They are flanked to the east by a rising great power (China); to the North by their former hegemon (Russia); to the south by a country collapsed in violent chaos (Afghanistan), a fundamental Islamic republic (Iran), and a fragile secular state in search of a greater regional role (Turkey). Along with these, a distant superpower seeks influence, if not dominance (US). 2
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course COMM 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Boise State.

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f_0019741_16817 - The Relations between Central Asian...

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