f_0007403_6316

F_0007403_6316 - Counter Transformations in the Center and Periphery of Turkish Society and the Rise of the Justice and Development Party Ramin

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Alternatives: Turkish Journal of International Relations, Vol. 7, No. 2 & 3, Summer & Fall 2008 15 Counter Transformations in the Center and Periphery of Turkish Society and the Rise of the Justice and Development Party Ramin Ahmadov * The election results on November 3, 2002, which brought the Justice and Development Party into power, shocked many, but for varying reasons. Afterwards, some became more hopeful about future of their country, while others became even more doubtful and anxious, since for them the “republican regime” came under threat. These opposing responses, along with the perceptions that fueled them, neatly describe the two very different worlds that currently exist within Turkish society, and so it is important to think through many of the contested issues that have arisen as a result of these shifting political winds. The winning Justice and Development Party (JDP) was established in 2001 by a group of politicians under the leadership of Recep Tayyip Erdogan, many of whom split from the religio-political movement of Necmetiin Erbakan, the National Outlook Movement, and the Welfare Party. Interestingly, in less than two years after its establishment, and at the first general election it participated in, the JDP received 34.29 % of the vote when all other established parties fell under the 10 % threshold. The only exception to this was the Republican People’s Party (19.38 %). The JDP captured 365 out of 550 seats in the parliament and therefore was given the opportunity of establishing the government alone, which is exactly what happened. Two years later, in the 2004 local elections, the JDP increased its votes to 41.46 %, while the RPP slightly decreased to 18.27 %, and the Nationalist Action Party increased to 10.10 % (from 8.35 % in 2002). Finally, in the most recent general elections in Turkey in 2007, which was marked by intense debate over presidential elections and an online military note, the JDP won nearly half of all votes, 46.58 %, and began its second term in power.
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Alternatives: Turkish Journal of International Relations, Vol. 7, No. 2 & 3, Summer & Fall 2008 16 What was noteworthy about all of this was not merely the JDP’s surprising rise to power, but its contributions to the consolidation of Turkish democracy and to economic improvements within such a short time period. During the five-year rule of the JDP, Turkey witnessed a “silent revolution,” as argued by Abdullah Gul. Turkish Parliament worked harder than ever to reform the political, bureaucratic, and judicial systems, which they hoped would bring Turkey into a compatible line with the European Union, while making the Turkish economy into the sixth most productive economy in Europe. The interesting point that I want to emphasize here is that a party established by the
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course BIOL 227 taught by Professor Koob during the Fall '11 term at Boise State.

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F_0007403_6316 - Counter Transformations in the Center and Periphery of Turkish Society and the Rise of the Justice and Development Party Ramin

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