tjir5-4d - Arab Middle East Governments: Security Concerns,...

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Alternatives: Turkish Journal of International Relations, Vol. 5, No.4, Winter 2006 77 Arab Middle East Governments: Security Concerns, Priorities and Policies* Adnan M. Hayajneh ** The aim of this paper is to present an examination of the security concerns, priorities and polices in the Arab Middle East governments. The paper will argue that internal security issues are the main security challenges in the Arab Middle East world. The paper consists of several parts including, assumptions of the study, definitions of security, the security menu and approaches to deal with it. The importance of the study is its point of departure from previous studies that concentrated on the regional aspects of security and ignored the internal security issues. They treated the external threats as the independent variable. This study will argue that external threats are the dependent variable and internal security issues are the independent variable (see Khatchik, 2003). Thus, if this theory is verified we can ask policy makers to change their view of security. More importantly it will affect our approaches of how to deal with security. The problem with security studies in the Arab world is the establishment of the causal relationships.
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Alternatives: Turkish Journal of International Relations, Vol. 5, No.4, Winter 2006 78 Glimpse on the Arab World: More than half of the Arab population is under the age of 20 years old putting the states of the Arab world on timely bombs that will explode on their faces in the short time unless real changes are to be taken today rather than tomorrow. (See Martin, 2003). H. M. King Abdullah described the challenges of the Arab World eloquently: “…The challenge of development. Reports show that per capita income has actually shrunk in the Arab countries during the last 20 years. One of every five Arabs lives on less than $2 a day, and in the labor force, one in seven is unemployed. Youth, who are more than sixty percent of the population, can be especially vulnerable. When young people lose hope, they can turn to apathy or violence, and either course threatens the drive for reform, and the move towards modernity… Today, the Middle East is on the frontlines, perhaps it is the frontline, of a global struggle for peace and development. In solving long-term conflicts, in achieving genuine development and reform, in living up to the values of our faith and heritage, in all these ways, the Arab World is engaged in a great enterprise. The results will impact the entire world.” (H.M. King Abdullah II, Munich Conference Feb. 8, 2004). The dilemmas of basic services, jobs and education are to be faced now rather than later. Thus, soft security issues are connected to real hard issues facing the Arab states regarding the changes in the regional balance of power and the lack of do not know how to deal with it is another dilemma. Martin (2003: 6) argued that the real challenges are not hard security issues. “Forget weapons of mass destruction: The biggest
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course HIST 494 taught by Professor Haus during the Fall '11 term at Boise State.

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tjir5-4d - Arab Middle East Governments: Security Concerns,...

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