A Comparison and Contrast of Love in Christopher Marlowe

A Comparison and Contrast of Love in Christopher Marlowe -...

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A Comparison and Contrast of Love in Christopher Marlowe's "The Passionate Shepherd to his Love" and C. Day Lewis's "Song" In the poems "The Passionate Shepherd to his Love" by Christopher Marlowe and "Song" by C. Day Lewis, the speakers display their individual views of what can be expected with their love. Both speakers produce invitations to love with differences in what they have to offer. A list of promised delights is offered by the speaker in "The Passionate Shepherd," and through persuasion, is able to influence the emotions of his love. The speaker in "Song" shows the difficulties of his life, as seen in his economic necessity and lack of material pleasures, but subsequently offers his love unconditionally in order to convince his beloved. In comparison the poems expose the speakers' use of separate methods to influence their loves. Through comparing and contrasting the context in which the invitations occur, what each speaker offers, and the tone of each speaker, these differing methods can be understood. The "Passionate Shepherd" is set in a romantic, natural backdrop in the seventeenth century. In this rural setting the Shepherd displays his flock and pastures to his love while promising her garlands and wool for weaving. Many material goods are offered by the speaker to the woman he loves in hopes of receiving her love in return. He also utilizes the power of speech to attempt to gain the will of his love. In contrast, the poem "Song" is set in what is indicative of a twentieth century depression, with an urban backdrop that is characteristically unromantic. The speaker "handle(s) dainties on the docks" (5) , showing that his work likely consists of moving crates as a dock worker. He extends his affection through the emphasis of his love and how it has endured and survived all hardships. He uses the truth of his poor and difficult situation as a tool to entice his love. In the "Passionate Shepherd", the speaker offers his lover a
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A Comparison and Contrast of Love in Christopher Marlowe -...

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