IAF 716 lean manufacturing st 12-00-52

IAF 716 lean manufacturing st 12-00-52 - LeanManufacturing...

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Lean Manufacturing Dr. Rama Srivastava Office: C2010 Email: rama.srivastava@senecac.on.ca
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What is Lean manufacturing Lean manufacturing  or  lean production , often simply, " Lean ," is a  production practice that considers the expenditure of resources for  any goal other than the creation of value for the end customer to be  wasteful, and thus a  target for elimination The great leap: Henry Ford as the first systematic, end to end process thinker- (1908) A 1000% leap in productivity with a dramatic reduction in cost and lead time for development and production. Now complex products reached the average person.
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Difference in Strategies What FORD forgot & General Motors supplied - Variety  – because everyone wanted something different Management - suited to the scale of giant enterprise: the modern  GM/GE – style organization  Low cost variety - with short lead time and high quality. Instead GM  (and then Ford) drifted into mass production with long lead time, high  inventories. Massive network, high production defects, high capital  investment for a given amount of capacity etc Management system that could engage every employee  in steady  improving every process
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The new system created a product with less human effort (in  space, less capital with fewer injuries  Ford- had a horizontal system,  GM- Vertical system,  Toyota- combined the two to have high velocity, deep  functional knowledge
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Principles of Lean 1. Specify value from customers perspective 2. Identify and eliminate steps that do not create value. 3. Make the value-creating steps occur in tight sequence to create flow 4. Establish pull, let customers pull value from the next upstream activity. 5. As value is specified, value streams are identified, wasted steps are removed, and flow and pull are introduced, begin the process again and continue it until a state of perfection is reached in which perfect value is created with no waste.
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What's a Lean (Perfect) Process? Eliminate the steps which do not add any value Evaluate each step on the following points - Is the step Valuable - no waste, is it adding value ? If workers are working hard, they are adding value…but not always Capable (TQM, six sigma) - no rework Available ( does it work ) software not working,….- Total productive maintenance Adequate - Theory of constraints- there may be a bottle neck, excess capacity at some other point. Flexible-
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IAF 716 lean manufacturing st 12-00-52 - LeanManufacturing...

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