ant_102_lecture_08_2011_finalsm - Lecture 7 - History of...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 7 - History of English - Including creoles Lecture 8 - Language and Identity - Dread Talk Language and meaning 1. What is said + what is implicated 2. What is conveyed by the way it is said What is conveyed by the way it is said e.g. I can convey that I am happy or angry or annoyed, impatient etc. But I can also convey something about who I think I am - i.e. IDENTITY A particular Language or variety of a Language can itself be a symbol of IDENTITY Regardless of what is being said the very language one uses serves as a symbol Today - looking at a particular case of Identity as present/conveyed through language. RASTAFARI and DREAD TALK Last time we considered creole languages Dread Talk can be described as a set of modiFcations to Jamaican Creole - Patwa. This is a formal/linguistic description Dread Talk aka. Iyaric, Liva lect, From the Land of Look Behind How did the Rastafari movement begin? Religion in Jamaica until Abolition 1834-8 How did the Rastafari movement begin? Background: From the earliest plantation days, Jamaican slaves were exposed to Christianity. Although the White plantation owners offered only equivocal support, missionaries came to Jamaica and converted many slaves to christianity How did the Rastafari movement begin? Christianity took off in Jamaica and spread quickly through the slave population though other forms of religion from West Africa - such as Kumina - as well as various syncretic forms such as Myal and Obeah were also practiced. How did the Rastafari movement begin? Christian association (combination of beliefs in the equality of all persons, salvation/liberation, political possibilities of congregation) formed the basis for early slave revolts. Samuel Sharp was a Deacon at the Burchell Baptist Church in Montego Bay. He travelled to different estates in St. James educating the slaves about Christianity and freedom. Sharpe had formed a Secret Society among the slaves and many of his meetings were held at night. In 1831 he led the Christmas Uprising in which 60,000 slaves took up arms against the planters. How did the Rastafari movement begin? Christian association (combination of beliefs in the equality of all persons, salvation/liberation, political possibilities of congregation) formed the basis for early slave revolts. Paul Bogle was a Deacon of the Native Baptist Church in Stony Gut, St. Thomas, Jamaica. Paul Bogle spent much of his time educating members of his congregation, and initiated the Morant Bay Rebellion in 1865. How did the Rastafari movement begin? Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr. was born in St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica in 1887 Between 1910 and 1914 Garvey travelled throughout Central America and eventually went to London to study at Birkbeck College In 1914 he returned to Jamaica and organized the Universal Negro Improvement Association UNIA motto, "One God, One Aim, One Destiny" How did the Rastafari movement begin?...
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course ANTHROPOLO 102 taught by Professor Dr.andreamuehelbach during the Fall '11 term at University of Toronto- Toronto.

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ant_102_lecture_08_2011_finalsm - Lecture 7 - History of...

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