ant_102_lecture_09_2011_finalsm

ant_102_lecture_09_2011_finalsm - Lecture 7 - History of...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 7 - History of English - Including creoles Lecture 8 - Language and Identity - Dread Talk Lecture 9 - Indexicality Language and meaning 1. What is said + what is implicated 2. What is conveyed by the way it is said Last time we considered the way the language-form (dread talk) conveys the identity of the speaker. Today - how the language-form conveys the identity of the hearer/ recipient. More accurate way to put this - The language-form conveys the speaker’s idea of who the hearer is. AN INTERESTING linguistic and cultural problem is the use in speech of various devices implying something in regard to the status, sex, age, or other characteristics of the speaker, person addressed, or person spoken of, without any direct statement as to such characteristics. When we say "big dog make bow-wow" instead of "the dog barks," it is a fair inference that we are talking to a baby, not to a serious-minded man of experience. A more specialized type of these person- implications is comprised by all cases in which the reference is brought about not by the use of special words or locutions, that is, by lexical, stylistic, or syntactic means, but by the employment of special grammatical elements, consonant or vocalic changes, or addition of meaningless sounds, that is, by morphologic or phonetic means. Speaker Recipient Who I am. e.g. Dread-talk Speaker Recipient Who your are e.g. Baby-talk and Nootka examples Speaker Recipient Who we are to one another. e.g. “Dude”, Nuer Ox-Names Nootka = Nuu-chah-nulth http://www.nuuchahnulth.org / The Nuu-chah-nulth were among the frst people oF the Pacifc to come into contact with Europeans. When James Cook frst encountered the villagers at Yuquot in 1778, they directed him to "come around" (Nuu-chah-nulth nuutkaa is "to circle around") with his ship to the harbour. Cook interpreted this as the native's name For the inlet—now called Nootka Sound—which came to be applied to the inhabitants oF the area. A coastal people - Language Wakashan - Culture - Pacifc Northwest Sapir - The Nootka diminutive: In speaking to or about a child it is customary to add the regular diminutive sufFx -'is to verb or other forms, even though the word so affected connotes nothing intrinsically diminutive...
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course ANTHROPOLO 102 taught by Professor Dr.andreamuehelbach during the Fall '11 term at University of Toronto.

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ant_102_lecture_09_2011_finalsm - Lecture 7 - History of...

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