ant_102_lecture_10_2011_finalsm - 1981 1981 Lecture 7 -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 1981 1981 Lecture 7 - History of English - Including creoles Lecture 8 - Language and Identity - Dread Talk Lecture 9 - Indexicality Lecture 10 - Social relations Language Conveys... Who I am. Who you are. Who we are to one another. Speaker Recipient Who I am. e.g. Dread-talk Speaker Recipient Who your are e.g. Baby-talk Speaker Recipient Who we are to one another. e.g. Dude, Nuer Ox-Names Conveying the relationship between speaker and recipient 1. Second person pronouns 2. Address terms Conveying the relationship between speaker and recipient 1. Second person pronouns In English no choice here - always you. But in many other languages speaker selects from more than one form - e.g. French tu , vous Conveying the relationship between speaker and recipient 1. Second person pronouns In the earlier forms of English there was a distinction between you and thou King Lear, Act I, Scene IV Lear and Kent (in disguise) King Lear, Act I, Scene IV Lear and Kent (in disguise) Lear: What's that? Kent: Authority. Lear: What services canst thou do? Kent: I can keep honest counsel, ride, run, mar a curious tale in telling it, and deliver a plain message bluntly. Lear: How old art thou ? Kent: Not so young, sir, to love a woman for singing, nor so old to dote on her for any thing: I have years on my back forty eight. Thou vs. You in Shakespeares English Lear: what art thou ? Kent: A man, sir. Lear: What dost thou profess? Kent: I do profess to be no less than I seem; to serve him truly that will put me in trust: to fear judgment; to fight when I cannot choose; and to eat no fish. Lear: What wouldst thou ? Kent: Service. Lear: Who wouldst thou serve? Kent: You . Lear: Dost thou know me, fellow? Kent: No, sir; but you have that in your countenance which I would fain call master. Lear: What's that? Kent: Authority. Lear: What services canst thou do? Kent: I can keep honest counsel, ride, run, mar a curious tale in telling it, and deliver a plain message bluntly. Lear: How old art thou ? Kent: Not so young, sir, to love a woman for singing, nor so old to dote on her for any thing: I have years on my back forty eight. Address terms in Shakespeares English Lear: what art thou?...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course ANTHROPOLO 102 taught by Professor Dr.andreamuehelbach during the Fall '11 term at University of Toronto- Toronto.

Page1 / 53

ant_102_lecture_10_2011_finalsm - 1981 1981 Lecture 7 -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online