ant_102_lecture_11_2011_finalsm

ant_102_lecture_11_2011_finalsm - The Question of...

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Unformatted text preview: The Question of Linguistic Relativity Languages differ in many ways - (see lecture 6) - but do those differences have any consequence? The Question of Linguistic Relativity Languages differ in many ways - (see lecture 6) - but do those differences have any consequence? Do they have any influence on the way speakers of a particular language.... The Question of Linguistic Relativity Languages differ in many ways - (see lecture 6) - but do those differences have any consequence? Do they have any influence on the way speakers of a particular language.... Think? Perceive the world? Construct relations between speaker and hearer? Do things (i.e. act: request, offer, agree etc.) The Question of Linguistic Relativity Languages differ in many ways - (see lecture 6) - but do those differences have any consequence? Do they have any influence on the way speakers of a particular language.... Think? Perceive the world? Construct relations between speaker and hearer? Do things (i.e. act: request, offer, agree etc.) Classic version of Linguistic Relativity Franz Boas Edward Sapir Benjamin Lee Whorf The Basic Argument: 1. Language is a system of classification/categorization 2. Speakers use these categories in thinking 3. Languages differ 4. Differences in language should correlate with differences in thinking. Classic version of Linguistic Relativity Edward Sapir The fact of the matter is that the real world is to a large extent unconsciously built up on the language habits of the group. No two languages are ever sufficiently similar to be considered as representing the same social reality. The worlds in which different societies live are distinct worlds, not merely the same world with different labels attached. Classic version of Linguistic Relativity Benjamin Lee Whorf "We dissect nature along lines laid down by our native languages. The categories and types that we isolate from the world of phenomena we do not find there because they stare each observer in the face." Classic version of Linguistic Relativity Thought Language X RELATIVE TO Y i.e. Dependent upon Shaped by Influenced by Affected by Classic version of Linguistic Relativity What is meant by thought here? Perception and memory of location in space. Perception of differences between colors Conception of the relation between form and substance Linguistic Relativity: the Prequel In 1888 he published a titled Alternating Sounds. Franz Boas Franz Boas Examples of American languages have often been brought forward to show that the accuracy of their pronunciation is much less than that found in the languages of the civilized world. Franz Boas It would seem that this view is based largely on the fact that certain sounds that occur in American languages are interpreted by observers sometimes as one European sound, sometimes as another. Franz Boas Lower Chinook has a sound which is readily perceived as a b, m, or w. As a mater of fact,...
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ant_102_lecture_11_2011_finalsm - The Question of...

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