Attitudes & persuasion lecture slides-1

Attitudes & persuasion lecture slides-1 - PSY 220...

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PSY 220 Social Psychology Attitudes and Persuasion
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Plan for Today Part 1: Attitudes: How do we evaluate people, objects, and ideas? Why don’t we always do what we say and say what we do? Part 2: Persuasion: How can we change people’s attitudes? Part 3: Term Test #1
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Four Questions 1. What are attitudes? 2. Where do they come from? 3. Do our attitudes influence our behaviour? 4. Does our behaviour influence our attitudes?
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Raise your hand if you feel completely neutral about:
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Raise your hand if you feel completely neutral about:
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Raise your hand if you feel completely neutral about:
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Raise your hand if you feel completely neutral about:
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1. What are attitudes? A psychological construct that represents your evaluations your like vs. dislike of people, objects, and ideas
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The ABCs of Attitudes A ffect (emotions) B ehaviour C ognitions (thoughts)
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The ABCs of Attitudes A ffect B ehaviour C ognitions
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The ABCs of Attitudes A ffect B ehaviour C ognitions
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Is the Bad Stronger than the Good? Losing $10 is more painful than gaining $10 is pleasurable Frightening sounds or noxious smells are more physiologically arousing than delicious tastes Brief contact with a cockroach spoils a delicious meal
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2. Where do attitudes come from? Personal experience “I once threw up my mom’s vegetable soup; I no longer eat her soup.” “I once saw three cockroaches on my
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2. Where do attitudes come from? Social learning “As a child, I watched my dad route for the Blue Jays; I love the Blue Jays.” “My best friend wants to be a Social Psychologist; so do I.”
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2. Where do attitudes come from? Genetic factors Attitudes of identical twins are more similar than those of fraternal twins e.g., attitudes toward death penalty, censorship, divorce, socialism, & jazz political affiliation and participation
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2. Where do attitudes come from? Evolutionary factors Some of deepest fears may have been adaptive in our evolutionary past.
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3. Do our attitudes influence our behaviour?
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Take a Moment Think about some of your attitudes the likes and dislikes that you have Think about how those attitudes influence your behaviour
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Raise Your Hand If you think your behaviours generally are consistent with your attitudes If you think your behaviours generally are not consistent with your attitudes
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LaPiere Study In the early 1930s, Richard LaPiere went on a sightseeing trip across the U.S. with a young Chinese couple. He was worried that prejudice against Asians would prevent them from getting service. But only one out of 251 establishments refused to serve them.
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