Lecture 2, War and Security

Lecture 2, War and Security - 1 Source: Reuters and...

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Jean-Antoine Watteau, Les fatigues de la guerre (c. 1716) Source: Reuters and  Libération 1
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This week A comment about this week’s readings General remarks War in the modern period Post war, Cold War Sources of insecurity in the post-Cold War 9/11 and the response to it 2
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Why start with war 1618-1648 World War I  Ever more powerful weapons 3
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“War”: A conventional definition “War is a period of armed hostilities within or  between states or other collectivities…. In war, killing  and physical destruction are both expected and  condoned, although the participants are expected to  follow the boundaries and constraints established by  existing laws and norms. War is distinguished from  other forms of organized political violence by casualty  rates: … a commonly accepted definition of war is an  armed conflict in which there are 1000 or more  death.” Sens and Stoett,  Global Politics: Origins, Currents,  Directions , p. 189 4
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Two basic types Interstate war Between 2 or more  states The main focus of  International  Relations What the principle  of sovereignty aimed  to prevent Civil war A.k.a. internal  conflict, communal  war , intrastate war Between factions,  ethnic groups, etc. Collapse of the  government Previously  5
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Security: a traditional definition National security Security of the nation-state Security of the institutions Security of the leadership Security of the territory International security Stability of the international  system Absence of interstate war =  peace A common phrase:  security” A narrow definition Two dimensions 6
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War in the modern period 7
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Westphalia: a relative  success? Limited goals of the sovereignty principle Major wars vs. “minor” wars 3 major exceptions Return to Westphalian principles (more or  less) Explaining the relative success Other exceptions War of Spanish Succession, 1701-1714 War of Austrian Succession, 1740-1748 Seven Years’ War, 1756-1753 Crimean War, 1853-1856 Franco-Prussian War, 1870-1871 8
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Polarity: the distribution of power Unipolarity:  one uncontested state. Variation: hegemonic state (most powerful but can’t act alone). Ex.: US today. Bipolarity:  two roughly equal states. Ex.: Cold War. Multipolarity:  3 or more roughly equal states.  Ex.: Europe in 1648, in the 19th century, before  World War II. 100 lbs.
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2012 for the course POL 2107 taught by Professor Bourgault during the Spring '08 term at University of Ottawa.

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Lecture 2, War and Security - 1 Source: Reuters and...

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