bargh2004 - Annu. Rev. Psychol. 2004. 55:573–90 doi:

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Unformatted text preview: Annu. Rev. Psychol. 2004. 55:573–90 doi: 10.1146/annurev.psych.55.090902.141922 Copyright c 2004 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved First published online as a Review in Advance on July 11, 2003 T HE I NTERNET AND S OCIAL L IFE John A. Bargh and Katelyn Y. A. McKenna New York University, New York, New York 10003; email: [email protected], [email protected] Key Words communication, groups, relationships, depression, loneliness ■ Abstract The Internet is the latest in a series of technological breakthroughs in interpersonal communication, following the telegraph, telephone, radio, and television. It combines innovative features of its predecessors, such as bridging great distances and reaching a mass audience. However, the Internet has novel features as well, most critically the relative anonymity afforded to users and the provision of group venues in which to meet others with similar interests and values. We place the Internet in its his- torical context, and then examine the effects of Internet use on the user’s psychological well-being, the formation and maintenance of personal relationships, group member- ships and social identity, the workplace, and community involvement. The evidence suggests that while these effects are largely dependent on the particular goals that users bring to the interaction—such as self-expression, affiliation, or competition—they also interact in important ways with the unique qualities of the Internet communication situation. CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573 THE INTERNET IN HISTORICAL CONTEXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575 EFFECTS ON INTERPERSONAL INTERACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577 In the Workplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578 Personal (Close) Relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580 Group Membership and Social Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 582 Community Involvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 THE MODERATING ROLE OF TRUST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585 CONCLUSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 586 INTRODUCTION It is interactive: Like the telephone and the telegraph (and unlike radio or tele- vision), people can overcome great distances to communicate with others almost instantaneously. It is a mass medium: Like radio and television (and unlike the telephone or telegraph), content and advertising can reach millions of people at the same time. It has been vilified as a powerful new tool for the devil, awash in 0066-4308/04/0204-0573$14.00 573 574 BARGH ¥ MCKENNA pornography, causing users to be addicted to hours each day of “surfing”—hours...
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2012 for the course POL 2107 taught by Professor Bourgault during the Spring '08 term at University of Ottawa.

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bargh2004 - Annu. Rev. Psychol. 2004. 55:573–90 doi:

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