African Dance Paper - R 1 Roberto Avila Instructor Jennie...

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R 1 Roberto Avila Instructor Jennie Pitts Dan 266 6 November 2011 The Essence of Hula Minutes before I had to attend the African dance session of the day, I sat inventively as my roommate practiced a popular hip-hop dance in our front living room. Wondering how such dances came into practice, I knew the origins would lie in the dance practiced in the mother country, Africa. The dance class would be an opportunity to understand and experience the rich culture and that has generated the one I’m living in today. The bass of the drums dissipated throughout the room, energizing the atmosphere of the dance studio. The immense amount of students participating in the class listened to Dominick, the class instructor, as he guided us through the beginning motions of the African style. The warm up ceased to open the body to the energetic rhythm of the dance. Legs began bending and arms twirled into synchronicity as the drums beats directed the motions. Capping off the warm-up, the rhythmic pace ceased to create an intense
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2012 for the course DANCE 200 taught by Professor Pitts during the Spring '11 term at University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

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African Dance Paper - R 1 Roberto Avila Instructor Jennie...

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