f_0017091_14615

f_0017091_14615 - 28 Jeanne Hull 2 Jeanne Hull is a Ph.D...

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Unformatted text preview: 28 Jeanne Hull 2 Jeanne Hull is a Ph.D candidate at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and Inter- national Affairs, Princeton University. “W E ’ RE ALL S MARTER THAN A NY O NE OF U S ”: T HE R OLE OF I NTER-A GENCY I NTELLIGENCE O RGANIZATIONS IN C OMBATING A RMED G ROUPS Jeanne Hull Non-state armed groups present a direct threat to U.S. national security at home and abroad. Their decentralized structures, informal and formal logistics networks, and ability to merge with and hide among the world’s civilian populations make them extremely difficult targets for threatened states and their intelligence and security organizations to address. Joint inter- agency and international intelligence and security efforts are arguably necessary to respond to such threats; however, despite the obvious advantages of intelligence collaboration at all levels of a conflict, obstacles to inter-agency and international coop- eration remain. These obstacles arise from lack of capability, a lack of will, or a combination thereof. This paper discusses three lack-of-will challenges related to collective action and two capability problems using as case studies tactical-operational joint-agency task forces in Bosnia and Northern Iraq Based on lessons learned from these cases, I recommend that Joint- Inter-Agency Task Forces (JIATFs) become integrated into U.S. joint doctrine, that lead agencies or personnel for these organizations be established at their inception, that JIATFs at the strategic level focus more on the importance of networking and cooperation than operations, and the incentive mechanisms 29 “We’re all Smarter than Any One of Us”: The Role of Inter-Agency Intelligence Organizations in Combating Armed Groups for participants be restructured to promote teamwork over individual accomplishment. These recommendations address a variety of problems with inter-agency collaboration; other problems—personalities paramount among them—require a more long-term approach. I NTRODUCTION Armed groups present a direct threat to U.S. national security at home and abroad. Their decentralized structures, informal and formal logistics networks, and ability to merge with and hide among the world’s civilian populations make them extremely difficult targets for threatened states and their intelligence and security organizations to address. In addition, those same security and intelligence organizations frequently lack an indigenous capability to collect and fuse actionable intelligence, develop a priority targeting list, and generate and adaptively implement the best mechanisms by which to attend to those targets. Joint inter-agency and international intelligence and security efforts are a necessary response to an adversary that has often proved both more cunning and more versatile than the efforts employed to counter it....
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course POLS 494 taught by Professor Garymoncrief during the Fall '11 term at Boise State.

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f_0017091_14615 - 28 Jeanne Hull 2 Jeanne Hull is a Ph.D...

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