The Future of Broadcast Radio

The Future of Broadcast Radio - The Future of Broadcast...

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Unformatted text preview: The Future of Broadcast Radio and Satellite Radio E.E. 4002 RF Circuit Design Randall Robert Jeffery Sawyer Ashkan Shaidaee Table of Contents: Topic Page Introduction3 AM (Amplitude Modulation).3 FM (Frequency Modulation)..3 Carrier Wave..3 Modern Day Radio and the Future of....4 iBiquity HD Radio..4 Benefits..5 Processing the Signal.6 Satellite Radio9 XM Radio..10 Sirius Satellite Radio.....12 Uses of Satellite Radio..14 XM Satellite Radio (brief overview).14 Sirius Satellite Radio (brief overview)..15 World Space Corporation..15 Military Applications.16 Works Cited...19 Allocation of topics (by student)...21 2 Introduction Broadcast radio as we now know it is going under some major renovations. As we are all aware there are two major types of free to air radio, AM broadcasts, and FM broadcasts. Before continuing, lets become more familiar with the terminology of present day radio. AM (Amplitude Modulation) Amplitude modulation was the primary method for radio broadcasting until the 1960s, when FM (see FM below) was introduced. An AM radio signal is broadcast at a constant frequency. By slightly altering the strengths of a particular frequency, or carrier frequency (see carrier wave below) information, in the form of sound, can be sent. The carrier wave is the station which the tuner is set to by the user. The changes in the signals power, better known as amplitude modulation, carries the stations audio information. AM stations broadcast between 535 kiloherz (KHz) and 1700 KHz (see figure 1 below). AM signals are more susceptible to atmospheric interference than FM, and are of a lower fidelity (Crutchfield)....
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The Future of Broadcast Radio - The Future of Broadcast...

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