f_0016629_14371

f_0016629_14371 - BOOK REVIEWS Institutional Interaction in...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations BOOK REVIEWS Institutional Interaction in Global Environmental Governance by John Martin Gillroy Institutional Interaction in Global Environmental Governance: Synergy and Conflict among International and EU Policies . Eds. Sebastian Oberthür and Thomas Gehing, Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2006. 425 pp. US$28.00 (paperback) ISBN 0-262-65110-6 John Stuart Mill wrote biographical pieces on both Jeremy Bentham and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Reflecting on these men, with the first establishing science as the key to social studies and the other reminding us that anything involving human beings must also be considered a subject of philosophical method, Mill argued that anyone considering themselves an intellectual must trace their ontology back to one of these giants. This insight marked the establishment of dividing the positive from the normative and the scientific from the human in social affairs - an insight which still impacts the professions of law and policy to this day. I believe the case studies presented in Institutional Interaction in Global Environmental Governance are well-written, informative, and thought-provoking. And while I find myself in substantial agreement with the importance of interaction effects, I put this book down with the lingering concern that the editors have ignored the important Coleridge component of philosophical argument completely—by buying into only the Benthamite side of social science research, the editors end up skipping some necessary elements of a systematic argument about interaction. The volume maintains that its purpose is to trace the origins of a “system of norms” for interactions between trans-national institutions and to create ideal-types that can be used for further study. Simultaneously, the editors claim that what they are doing is exclusively “empirical,” with statistical analysis at the end toward which the entire effort aims. Considered at this superficial level, Institutional Interaction in John Martin Gillroy is a professor of International Relations at Lehigh University and a Continuing Visiting Fellow at Wolfson College, Cambridge. 161
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
GILLROY The Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations Global Environmental Governance makes the case that the operationalization of both EU and international governance structures do not come about in isolation, but are the products of interaction between embedded, nested, vertical, or horizontally connected institutions. These interactions, within what G. Majone calls a “policy space,” are first set out within a theoretical model (Chapters One and Two), then this model is tested heuristically by being adopted for use in the ten case studies of EU and international environmental law that comprise the bulk of this book (Chapters Three through Twelve). Finally, in completing their empirical analysis of norms, the editors quantitatively coded and statistically analyzed the cases as a way to provide
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 8

f_0016629_14371 - BOOK REVIEWS Institutional Interaction in...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online