03.30.09.Emperors.Isis

03.30.09.Emperors.Isis - GREEK AND ROMAN RELIGIONS...

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GREEK AND ROMAN RELIGIONS 03.30.09: Becoming a god (cont’d); IsisMidterm review
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Ara pacis Augustae Decreed by Senate in 13 BCE, dedicated in 9 BCE. In honor of Augustus’ return after three years abroad in Spain and Gaul Dedicated to Pax (Peace), who become widely personified as a goddess (later emperors would also honor the deity, with Vespasian erecting a forum/temple to Pax) Art and thematic program connecting Augustus to his divine forbearers
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Plan of Ara Pacis (Or Pax per the Oxford Archaeology Guide)
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Aeneas Sacrificing and the Penates
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Romulus and Remus - Lupercal
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Processional Frieze - Augustus
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Frieze – Agrippa & Members of the Imperial Family
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Imperial Cult and Society Priesthoods for different principes (plural of princeps ) i.e. Augustales, Sodales Flaviales were important social outlets. Freedmen (former slaves) were frequently barred from high society, but could find status and “belonging” as members of the imperial cult. Also, temples maintained by collections of cities served as important civic focuses
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Prodigia and Rule “Signs” could be a portent of future things to come and future rule (i.e. Augustus and the signs of his coming rule). A way to legitimate and mold the image of an emperor. As R. Lattimore has pointed out, highest frequencies of these sorts of omen for emperors who rose to power during civil war – i.e. Augustus and later Vespasian (who took the throne after three other claimants during a civil war in 69 CE)
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Vespasian and the Flavians (i.e. his family) Incident in Alexandria Portents (Suetonius again records them) On his arrival in Rome, Vespasian and his son Titus, before celebrating their triumph over the J ews, spent the night in the Isaeum (temple of Isis) on the Campus Martius outside the pomerium Domitian (Vespasian’s younger son) escaped capture by pretending to be a priest of Isis
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Priest of Isis, Roman bronze, from Herculaneum 50 – 45 BCE Notably, they’re usually bald in the iconography.
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Priest and Priestess of Isis, near Vesuvius, 1 st century CE
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course 190 326 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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03.30.09.Emperors.Isis - GREEK AND ROMAN RELIGIONS...

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