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02.04.09.Rituals.SacredSpace.Household

02.04.09.Rituals.SacredSpace.Household - GREEK AND ROMAN...

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GREEK AND ROMAN RELIGIONS (01:190:326) 02/04/09: Festivals, Public Cult and Temples, Private Worship
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Thesmophoria Three day festival lasting from the 11 th to the 13 th Pyanepsion Only married women could participate Under the leadership of two archousai (pl. of feminine of archon ) Mythological explanation – remembered the kidnapping of Persephone / Kore by Hades Remembered Demeter Thesmophoros (Demeter who gives the [agrarian] law) Rites kept in mystery, only contemporary source that deals explicitly with the rite is Aristophanes’ comedy Thesmophouriazousae ( Women at the Thesmophoria )—and even then, details lacking, since he wasn’t privy to details. Authors frequently exaggerate details, including hostility of the women participating in the rite to men, etc.
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S tenia (preparatory festival) On the 10 th , women withdrew from the city after having refrained from sexual relations for several days to Halimos, exchanged obscene banter ritually. (Google maps link to modern day Halimos)
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Anodos: The Road Up Women returned to city on the 11 th Procession ( pompe ) to the Thesmophorion on the sacred hill called the Pnyx. View of the Acropolis from the Pnyx
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Nesteia: Fasting Women fast all day Sit on ground on beds made of withy, an anaphrodisiac Engage in aischrologia: mocking and obscene gestures Law courts and council suspended
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Megara and Antleriai At some point in the ritual, ( antleriai )“bailers” went down to collect decayed piglets that had earlier been placed in megara (crypts or crevices) near the sanctuary of Demeter along with clay phalluses and snakes. Because the sort of crevices supposedly attracted snakes, women surrounding the antleriai made noise to scare them off. Antleriai engaged in three days without sexual intercourse prior to the rite.
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Kalligenia: Fair Birth Women broke fast, feasting held Mixed ingredients, including pig remains, upon altar of Thesmophorion in a sacrifice to Demeter Mixture was strewn on the fields to promote fertility Displays idea of “inversion” – women abstain in order to promote fertility, also mirror the myth (which you will read later) This is the model used in Athens, varied from community to community where and how rite was performed.
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Or: The Origin of Blaming It On the Other Guy Thargelia
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Thargelia In honor of Apollo, held on the 7 th Thargelion in Athens and also in some Ionian towns. Sacrifices in honor of Apollo, also choral competitions, with a prize going to the choragos (responsible for paying for and raising the chorus). The day prior, ritual of the pharmakos (“scapegoat”) carried out. This ritual varied (again) from place to place, marked beginning of harvest season.
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Pharmakos In Athens, two men (one for the women, one for men) chosen and kept at state expense (fed at the prytaneion – the “public house”).
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