Aristotle comparative politics

Aristotle comparative politics - Dr. Chris West Nature of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Aristotle’s comparative politics: the regime Books 3-6 develops his idea of the regime and regime politics Book 1 told us about the metaphysiscs of his politics Here he talks more empirically , more politically Politeia is the centerpiece of his politics and books 3-6: the nature of politics For Aristotle, regime refers to both: 1) the forma l enumeration of rights and duties 2) And, the matter of the regime: the way of life or culture of a people: habits, morals, etc. What is the identity of a city? what gives it its identity?: the regime does Distinguishes the matter and form of the regime Matter is one distinguisher of the regime: the material basis, the citizen body and its character This is not to be confused with other associative features: Not defined by a group of people who occupy the same geography “its walls” Not simply a defensive alliance against invasion (NATO) Not simply a relationship for commercial cooperation (NAFTA, WTO) What then is a citizen body, a regime? Dr. Chris West Nature of Politics Spring 2009 February 11, 2009 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Held together by bonds of common affection, loyalty, friendship Affection is the intentional choice of living together Affection prevents conflict But, what kind of friendship is this? Political friendships are not those that ask us to give up our own identity (not lovers or best friends) Civic friendship has an element of sibling rivalry: outdoing one another for the achievement of the public good: competition for esteem and recopgnition from the “parent”-like city The civic bond is not mere calculation of self-interest, not simply a rational transaction for self-preservation or survival It is like the Bonds of loyalty and commeraderie that hold together a team, a club These require “social capital” a la Robert Putnam The city does not exist for mere life, but for the good life: a common way of life Identification with the city requires the sharing of deliberation and office, participation A citizen is one that both enjoys the protection of the law and participation in the making of the law We might say that his definition of citizenship is most fitting to his description of democracy: ruling and being ruled. Dr. Chris West Nature of Politics Spring 2009 February 11, 2009 2
Background image of page 2
Is the good citizen and the good person the same thing? The good citizen is relative to the regime: virtue is regime relative (a good democratic citizen vs. a good citizen of a monarchy) Only in the best regime will the good citizen and the best person be the same But he doesn’t tell us what the best regime is yet The point is: there are several kinds of regimes, differing in matter and form Matter - the people and culture Form : the constitution, the law, who governs; the formal distribution of powers and rule Its structures and institutions (what modern political thought is consumed with) Two definitions of regimes:
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course 790 101 taught by Professor Graf during the Spring '09 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 12

Aristotle comparative politics - Dr. Chris West Nature of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online