Logic02 - Introduction to Logic Lecture 2 Brian Weatherson,...

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Introduction to Logic Lecture 2 Brian Weatherson, Department of Philosophy September 8, 2009 Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 2 1 / 24
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Academic Integrity To start today, we’re going to have a presentation on academic integrity from the Office of Student Judicial Affairs. Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 2 2 / 24
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Academic Integrity The issues about plagiarism in a subject like logic are somewhat different to what they are in essay-based subjects, like ethics or epistemology. In particular, the issue about where we draw the line between talking to one another about work (which is good!) and just submitting someone else’s work (which is bad!) is a little trickier to draw. The one bright line rule is that you must write up your own work - you can’t submit files that were written, or even started, by someone else. Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 2 3 / 24
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Academic Integrity The software we use has tools to detect this. If it indicates to me that two people have submitted files that were produced, in whole or in part, at the same time on the same computer, that is good evidence that someone is plagiarising. The first time this happens, I’ll warn both parties. The second time it happens, I won’t accept the work. So it’s fine to talk to each other about the assignments, but you must do your own work. Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 2 4 / 24
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Logical Validity Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 2 5 / 24
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Arguments “An argument isn’t just contradiction. An argument is a connected series of statements intended to support a proposition.” We call the ‘connected series of statements’ the premises of the argument. And we call the proposition supported the conclusion of the argument. Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 2 6 / 24
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Identifying Premises and Conclusions Premises: Are given as evidence in favor of the intended conclusion; Often, though not always, come before conclusions; Are introduced by words like ‘because’, ‘since’ and ‘after all’ Conclusions: Are supported by the premises; Often, though not always, come after premises; Are introduced by words like ‘hence’, ‘thus’, ‘so’ and ‘consequently’ Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 2 7 / 24
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course 730 201 taught by Professor Jonwinterbottom during the Fall '11 term at Rutgers.

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Logic02 - Introduction to Logic Lecture 2 Brian Weatherson,...

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