Logic01 - Introduction to Logic Lecture 1 Brian Weatherson,...

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Introduction to Logic Lecture 1 Brian Weatherson, Department of Philosophy September 2, 2009 Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 1 1 / 29
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Information Lecturer: Brian Weatherson Office: 1 Seminary Place, Room 014, College Avenue Campus Hours: Thursday 3.00-4.25 Email: brian@weatherson.org Email is by far the best way to contact me. You will also need my email address for submitting assignments. Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 1 2 / 29
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Website This course has a website through Sakai - http://sakai.rutgers.edu All of the notes you see here will be on the Sakai site The site has the course syllabus, with the assignments There will be some quizzes to be done through the Sakai site Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 1 3 / 29
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Textbook The textbook for this course is Language Proof and Logic . You must buy this book new; otherwise you will not be able to register the software that comes with the book. The CD that comes with the book includes a PDF of the entire book. If you have that, you barely need to carry the book around with you. Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 1 4 / 29
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Assessment The assessment in this course will be in 3 parts. Most of the assessment will come from weekly assignments - that will make up 60% of the grade. There is a midterm worth 10%. And there is a final worth 30%. Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 1 5 / 29
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Assignments There will be assignments from the textbook every week. There will be 11 in total and your best 9 will count towards your final grade. The first assignment is due in 10 days time, on Friday 11th, so make sure you have the textbook asap. The assignments will always be due on Fridays at 5pm. Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 1 6 / 29
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Identifying Arguments Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 1 7 / 29
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Two Kinds of Arguments Sometimes when we talk about arguments, we just mean people arguing with one another. For instance, we might talk about Sasha and Malia arguing over who to invite to the White House. But sometimes when we talk about arguments, we mean that one person is giving reasons for their point of view. For instance, we might talk about President Obama’s argument in favor of health care reform. We’re going to be interested in the second kind of argument. Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 1 8 / 29
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Two Kinds of Arguments Here is an old Monty Python sketch that sets out the difference between the two kinds. (We’ll play the audio of this in class – you can’t hear it on the downloaded slides.) Logic 201 (Section 5) Lecture 1 9 / 29
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Monty Python on Arguments “An argument isn’t just contradiction. An argument is a connected series of statements intended to support a proposition.” We call the ‘connected series of statements’ the premises of the argument. And we call the proposition supported the
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course 730 201 taught by Professor Jonwinterbottom during the Fall '11 term at Rutgers.

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Logic01 - Introduction to Logic Lecture 1 Brian Weatherson,...

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