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Air PPT - U.S Airline Industry U.S Air transportation The...

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U.S. Airline Industry U.S. Airline Industry Air transportation: The invention that changed the world.
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History History Few inventions have changed how people live and experience the world as much as the invention of the airplane. During both World Wars, government subsidies and demands for new airplanes vastly improved techniques for their design and construction. Following the World War II, the first commercial airplane routes were set up in Europe.
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History History Over time, air travel has become so commonplace that it would be hard to imagine life without it. The airline industry, therefore, certainly has progressed. It has also altered the way in which people live and conduct business by shortening travel time and altering our concept of distance, making it possible for us to visit and conduct business in places once considered remote.
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Overview Overview The airline industry exists in an intensely competitive market. In recent years, there has been an industry-wide shakedown, which will have far-reaching effects on the industry's trend towards expanding domestic and international services. In the past, the airline industry was at least partly government owned. This is still true in many countries, but in the U.S. all major airlines have come to be privately held .
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Industry organization Industry organization Airlines transport passengers and freight over regularly scheduled routes or on routes, called “charters,” specifically designed for a group of travelers or a particular cargo. Several classes of airlines function in the United States. There are 15 mainline air carriers that use large passenger jets (more than 90 seats); 75 regional carriers that use smaller piston, turboprop, and regional aircraft (up to 90 seats); and 25 all-cargo carriers.
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Structure of the Industry Structure of the Industry International - 130+ seat planes that have the ability to take passengers just about anywhere in the world. Companies in this category typically have annual revenue of $1 billion or more. National - Usually these airlines seat 100-150 people and have revenues between $100 million and $1 billion. Regional - Companies with revenues less than $100 million that focus on short-haul flights. Cargo - These are airlines generally transport goods.
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Regional Carriers Regional Carriers There are approximately 75 regional carriers operating in the U.S. Regional airlines operate short-haul and medium-haul scheduled airline service with an emphasis on connecting smaller communities with larger cities and hubs. Some of the largest regional carriers are subsidiaries of the major airlines, but most are independently owned, often contracting their services to the majors.
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Low Cost Carriers Low Cost Carriers The are several low-cost carriers.
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