Rail-PPT - Profile of Railroads in the U.S. Freight...

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Unformatted text preview: Profile of Railroads in the U.S. Freight railroads are critical to the economic well-being and global competitiveness of the United States. History Rail: dominant mode from 1850s to WW II Superior in both price and service quality to road transport for most of this period Superior in service quality to water transport Development facilitated by standardization of track gauge and rolling stock Pivotal role in U.S. economic development Great expansion in track mileage, post-1870s Financed by private capital More History Domination begins to wane after 1920 1929: rail carried 75% of freight ton-miles Today: carries about 43% of freight ton-miles Decline of Railroads Some reasons for relative decline Large-scale government construction programs for roads and inland waterways Private financed construction for oil pipelines Government also helped develop air transport that provided superior service for passengers and mail Economy and shipper service-related needs change Note: total rail ton-miles continue to grow U.S Railroad Industry 2009 Railroad Number Miles Employ Rev. Bil Class I 7 93,921 151,906 46.1 Regional 23 12,804 6,025 1.3 Local 533 32,393 11,960 2.0 Total US 563 139,118 169,891 49.4 Canada 2 561* Grand Total 565 139,679 139,679 miles of road owned by railroads 24,045 locomotives* 1.36 million rail freight cars* 74 cars per freight train 169,891 workers [Class I 151,906] 3 cents revenue per ton mile 918 miles avg. length of haul $49.4 billion annual operating revenue 9.79% rate of return on shareholders equity* Selected 2009 Rail Freight Statistics 1,200 780 566 458 216 168 157 155 158 162 152 78 72 68 68 71 65 129 200 80 74 74 250 500 750 1,000 1,250 1,500 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2009 Others Class I U.S. Railroad Industry Staffing [in thousands] Structure Class I railroads are those with operating revenue of at least $272 million in 2002. Class I carriers comprise only 1 percent of the number of U.S. freight railroads, but they account for 67 percent of the industry's mileage operated, 89 percent of its employees, and 93 percent of its freight revenue. Structure Regional railroads are line haul railroads with at least 350 route miles and/or revenue of between $40 million and the Class I threshold. There were 23 regional railroads in 2009. Regional railroads typically operate 400 to 650 miles of road serving a region located in two to four states. Most regional railroads employ between 75 and 500 workers, although four have more than 600 employees. Structure Class I carriers typically operate in many different states and concentrate largely (though not exclusively) on long-haul, high-density intercity traffic lanes....
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course BMGT 350 taught by Professor Boyd during the Fall '08 term at Maryland.

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Rail-PPT - Profile of Railroads in the U.S. Freight...

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