Class Notes - INTL 4770 18:11 Academic Notes: Collective...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
INTL 4770 18:11 Academic Notes:  Collective Security An attack against any member of the group is an attack against all the members of the  group  Fundamental break from realist predictions Requires: 1) Favorable balan11ce of power and 2) The collective must have credibility  (capacity and willingness)  Steps to resolve disputes:  1) Negotiations and LoN recommendations  2) Economic sanctions on aggressive states  3) Military action Game Notes:  The Past-Current and Current view of the world should be historically accurate; the way  forward section can be created by our team The first two sections must be written with regards to history and actual relative  capabilities at the time The log must be used to track what is/is not working/ who is not cooperative and how  we’ll change our strategies based upon world’s response Great deal of continuity between NSS More consistency in democracies than non democracies Do we think in terms of absolute or relative gains?  Remember the distinction between security vs. power Multilateral or unilateral strategies? 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
9/1/10 18:11 On “The Security Dilemma in Alliance Politics”  Definition: Defensive preparations make everyone less secure because other states feel  insecure and respond by arming themselves as well  Apply this to alliances: If both ally, then both are less secure (like a 2,2 in a prisoner’s  game)  More absolute power = less security; a system with military alliances is less secure than  one without one. However, all states have incentive to form military alliances (incentive  through international anarchy and no matter what other states do)  (particular interests) Specific alliances are indeterminate  Secondary Alliance Dilemma: Two Concerns: 1)  abandonment  – Create security policies in conjunction with partner,  but what if partner bails? What if partner doesn’t come to defense in war or leaves and  finds “more beneficial dance partner?” and 2)  entrapment  – I have to support you in a  fight I didn’t want to get in to. Alliances simply increase your number of enemies (you  gain alliance partner’s rivals)  These two are inversely related; fixing one often increases fears of the other. If worried  about abandonment, you integrate, tie fates together, and integrate security  architectures = solve abandonment problem, but make entrapment problem worse. And  vice versa.  I.e. – France is super concerned about entrapment Look at the basic logic of the table in the other notes  
Background image of page 2
9/14/10 18:11 Notes on What Makes Deterrence Work:
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
9/14/10 18:11 General vs. Immediate deterrence  General – simply convince other states not to enter into conflict in general, no immediate 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/31/2012 for the course INTL 4440 taught by Professor Manget during the Fall '09 term at University of Georgia Athens.

Page1 / 15

Class Notes - INTL 4770 18:11 Academic Notes: Collective...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online