v7n2_09 - The Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and...

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Unformatted text preview: The Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations The Determinants of Internal Conflict in the Third World by Hae S. Kim O f the many characteristics that set the First World apart from the Third World, one of great significance is the frequency of internal conflict and political violence occurring in the latter. While many Third World countries experience a much higher frequency of internal conflict and political violence than their First World counterparts, not all less developed countries (LDCs) in the Third World experience internal conflict and political violence. As such, it seems that the Third World can be dichotomized between conflict-stricken and non-conflict-stricken countries. What causes the occurrence and nonoccurrence of internal conflict and political violence in some countries of the Third World? This paper addresses that question by analyzing determinants of internal conflict and identifies those conditions that dichotomize between the occurrence and nonoccurrence of internal conflict in Third World countries. Utilizing a multivariate analysis, moreover, this paper seeks to understand which factors may be contributing to such conflict. The attacks in the US on September 11th and the subsequent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have overshadowed crises and internal wars prevalent in other parts of the world, particularly in the Third World’s LDCs. Crises in other parts of the Third World have become “forgotten crises” when indeed they are still active and significant. 1 Conflict-stricken Third World countries suffer from, inter alia, poverty, refugees, civil wars, political violence and instability, food shortage, drought, AIDS, famine, as well as economic devastation. Internal crises, as manifested by ethnic conflicts, religious conflicts, riots, forceful overthrows of governments, secessionist or independence movements, or civil and political violence, may arise for a number of reasons: racial, religious, cultural, ideological, and economic factors, as well as political and social structures. In recent decades the world community has witnessed a high frequency of such terms as “ethnic conflict,” “ethnocentrism,” “ethnonationalism,” and “ethnic cleansing.” These “ethnic” prefixes have been more widely used since the end of the Cold War. Also, such terms portray internal conflict as based on ethnic-racial lines Hae S. Kim is an Associate Professor of International Relations at Troy University. Dr. Kim received his Ph.D. from Florida State University. His recent publications include: “Analysis of the Gap Between Growth and Income Inequality in the Third World,” in the National Social Science Journal (1998)....
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course INTERNATIO 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '09 term at Boise State.

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v7n2_09 - The Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and...

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