December 1- prejudice - A-Cognitive Sources 1...

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A-Cognitive Sources 1- Categorization & Sterotyping 2- Out-group homogeneity effect a. Tendency that once split into categories or groups, to see them as more similar than they actually are b. Due to a lack of experience with members of out-groups b.i. We don’t have a lot of deindividuating info because we don’t interact with them c. Essentially how human mind organizes info and contributes to prejudice 3- Accentuation - Overestimating between group differences a. In order to avoid gray areas, the mind creates distinctions 4- Illusory correlation and confirmation bias (Hamilton & Gifford’s Group A &B Study) a. Seeing an association between category membership and behavior a.i. Because mind actively seeks out correlations or patterns where none actually exist a.ii. The mind seeks patterns and order b. Offered people info about two different groups: A and B c. Provided subjects with 30 pieces of information and fifteen pieces of information about the other group d. With respect to group A, 20 were positive, and 10 were negative e. For group B (15 total)- 5 are bad, and 10 are desirable e.i. So the ratio is 2:1 for both of them f. The subjects in the study are asked to make a series of judgments about group A and B f.i. Group A got evaluated more favorably f.i.1. b/c they have more information on group A f.i.2. you have more info about “in-groups” g. *instances of undesireable behavior are salient and overaffect our judgement when we have little information about a group of people g.i. May only take one example to overshade our attitude towards a group h. Once a relationship is perceived to exist, you have a schema h.i. Once you have a schema, you look for more information that supports what you believe, and to discard or explain away things that contradict what they believe, and distort information to make it fit what they believe 5-
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