Bivariate+Data+-+I-1

Bivariate+Data+-+I-1 - Bivariate Data -I Bivariate Data Up...

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Bivariate Data - I
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Bivariate Data Up to now, dealt with data in which there was only one variable we were interested in. In other words there was exactly one data point for each experimental unit. Many interesting problems in statistics involve dealing with experimental units in which there are several variables of interest. This is called multivariate data.
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Bivariate Data Multivariate data – consists of values or characters for several different variables that are obtained from the same experimental unit. For now, focus on the case where there are two different variables for the same experimental unit. The two variables can be both quantitative, both qualitative or mixed.
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Bivariate Data Here are several examples Both qualitative Blood type and eye color – nominal and nominal Profession and highest level of education – nominal and ordinal Highest level of education and military rank – ordinal and ordinal On is quantitative, the other is qualitative Income and profession – discrete and nominal Income and highest level of education – discrete and ordinal
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Quantitative & Quantitative
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Example 1: Hubble data In 1929, Edwin Hubble investigated the relationship between distance of a galaxy from the earth and the velocity with which it appears to be receding. Galaxies appear to be moving away from us no matter which direction we look. This is thought to be the result of the "Big Bang". Hubble hoped to provide some knowledge about how the universe was formed and what might happen in the future. The data collected include distances (megaparsecs) to 24
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Example 1: Hubble data Obs. # Distance Velocity Obs. # Distance Velocity 1 0.032 170 13 0.9 650 2 0.034 290 14 0.9 150 3 0.214 -130 15 0.9 500 4 0.263 -70 16 1.0 920 5 0.275 -185 17 1.1 450 6 0.275 -220 18 1.1 500 7 0.45 200 19 1.4 500 8 0.5 290 20 1.7 960 9 0.5 270 21 2.0 500 10 0.63 200 22 2.0 850 11 0.8 300 23 2.0 800 12 0.9 -30 24 2.0 1090
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Example 1: Hubble data Notice that for each observation, there are two numbers associated with it, distance and velocity.
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2012 for the course STATS 285 taught by Professor Popel during the Spring '09 term at Rutgers.

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Bivariate+Data+-+I-1 - Bivariate Data -I Bivariate Data Up...

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