Gendered Communication

Gendered Communication - Human Communication. A Publication...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Human Communication. A Publication of the Pacific and Asian Communication Association. Vol. 10, No. 4, pp. 437 ± 450. Self-Construal, Interpersonal Communication Satisfaction, and Communication Style: Engendering Differences Mary L. Rucker Wright State University Dominique M. Gendrin Xavier University of Louisiana Mary L. Rucker, (Ph.D., Purdue University, 2000), Associate Professor in the Department of Communication, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435 Phone: (937) 775-2631. Email: mary.rucker@wright.edu. Dominique M. Gendrin, (Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1988), Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Communications, Bellsouth Endowed Chair, Xavier University of Louisiana. All correspondence regarding this study should be addressed to Dr. Rucker: mary.rucker@wright.edu. An earlier version of this manuscript was presented at the 2007 Southern States Communication Association annual meeting from March 28-April 1 in Louisville, Kentucky
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Mary L. Rucker and Dominique M. Gendrin 438 Abstract T h i s s t u d y e x t e n d s t h e l i t e r a t u r e o n s e l f - c o n s trual by examining its influence on male and female interpersonal communication satisfaction and communication styles in the U.S. The self- construal construct has been typically used to examine intercultural differences in self- definitions, but has not been used to study gender differences in the dominant culture of the U.S. The independent-samples t test revealed no significant difference between male and female independent and interdependent self-construals and direct communication style. However, there was a significant difference found between the two groups± indirect communication style, with the male sample having a significantly higher mean. For the male sample, the regression analyses indicated that independent and interdependent self-construals are not predictive of their interpersonal communication satisfaction. For the female sample, the corresponding standardized and unstandardized regression coefficients indicated that their interdependent self-construal is more predictive of their interpersonal communication satisfaction than their independent self- construal.
Background image of page 2
Engendering Differences 439 Self-Construal, Interpersonal Communication Satisfaction, and Communication Style: Engendering Differences This study extends the literature on self-construal by examining its influence on male and female interpersonal communication satisfaction and communication styles in the U.S. Research on gender differences has proliferated in the communication (Clair, 1993a, 1993b; Putnam, 1982) and psychological literature for over four decades, providing us with new ways to conceptualize gender differences as social, cultural, psychological, and communication constructions (Levine, 1991; Putnam 1982). The self-construal construct has been typically used to examine individual level cultural differences among collectivistic and individualistic societies, but has not been used to study gender differences in the dominant culture of the U.S.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 14

Gendered Communication - Human Communication. A Publication...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online