turning points

turning points - Socialization Turning Points: The...

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Unformatted text preview: Socialization Turning Points: The Organization/Individual Relation David Armon University of Utah The relationship between worker and organization is complex. By the time the relationship is terminated (by either party) each has had a pro- found affect upon the other. I n large organizations the effect of any single employee on the organization may be minimal, but in any size organ- ization the effects of the organization upon the individual are usually significant. As Van Maanen and Schein point out "...from the time indivi- duals enter a work place to the time they leave their membership behind, they often experience and commit themselves to a distinct way of life complete with it's own rhythms, rewards, relationships, demands and poten- tials" (1979, p. 210). This influence no matter how large or small is a phenomenon of importance to both managers and workers. Through the trans- ference of values, beliefs and goals the newcomer is inculcated in the ways of the organization. During this process, the new employee begins to learn what the organization perceives as important. A s an individual internalizes the values and beliefs of the organization he/she begins to identify with the organization. " F r o m an organizational perspective. 59 member identification is beneficial in that it guarantees that decisions will be consistent with organizational objectives" (Tompkins & Cheney, 1983, p. 125). Identification Some of the more commonly accepted definitions of identification include: Some degree of belongingness or loyalty (Lee, 1971; Buchanan, 1974, p. 533); An active process by which individuals link themselves to elements in the social scene (Cheney, 1983a, p. 342); A person identifies himself with a group when, in making a decision, he evaluates the several alternatives of choice in terms of the consequences for the specified group (Simon, 1976, p. 205). The influence of identification on various aspects of an employees work indicates the importance of the subject. Previous research has shown the impact of identification upon a variety of work related attitudes, behaviors and outcomes such as motivation (Katz, 1964, Galbraith, 1978, and Etzioni, 1975), job satisfaction (Likert, 1967), job performance (Kaufman, 1960), individual decision making (March and Simon, 1958), socialization (Buchanan, 1974), and employee interaction (Patchen, 1970). As Burke (1969b) suggests, identification is necessary to compensate for the "mystery or estrangement inherent in man's division of labor" (p. 158), indicating that as humans we have a need to identify with our organization to alleviate the segregation and alienation created in the complex world. "With so much emphasis on distinctions and differences (consider social strata, the bureaucratic model, and elitism as just a few examples), identification arises as a communicative cooperative response." 60 So then, "as an individual response to the division of society, a person acts to identify with some target(s),...
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turning points - Socialization Turning Points: The...

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