Lecture 9 - GenderandWomenStudies Lecture9 16:57 Lecture9...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Gender and Women Studies  Lecture 9 16:57 Lecture 9 2/23/11 Today There are more than 25 STIs known today Approximately 19 million new STIs each year Almost half of the new cases of STIs are young people 15-24 years of age Wisconsin Rates of STIs among teens reach epidemic levels  The Capital Times.  Wednesday, January 6, 2010 Related to health disparities? Access, treatment, outcomes Females and minorities have been hit hard Milwaukee County has some of the highest rates of poverty, teen pregnancy, infant  mortality, and STIs in the entire nation- rates that account for nearly half of the state’s  STIs Out of 11 priorities listed in Wisconsin’s public health plan, Healthiest Wisconsin 2010: Reducing risky sexual behavior, including STD rates Goal of WI health plan: cut the rate of the most common STIs (Chlamydia and  gonorrhea) by more than half Chlamydia Goal 138 cases per 100,000 in 2010 304 in 200
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
371 in 2008 Gonorrhea Goal: 63 cases per 100,000 in 2010 130 in 2000 92 in 2005 121 in 2007  Syphilis Goal: 0.2 cases per 100,000 in 2010 HIV  In 2007, the rate of infection was nearly three times the target established for 2010 Organisms that cause STIs Viruses Non-living organisms Capsules of genetic material (DNA and RNA)  Do not reproduce by cell division Require a living host to multiply Plant, animal, human When a host cell is attacked by the virus, it produces copies of the original virus at a  very fast rate  Difficult to kill May eventually kill the host cells  Some viruses:
Background image of page 2
Are contagious (genital herpes, genital warts, flu, common cold) Are not contagious (rabies, some forms of conjunctivitis)  Do not cause changes to the infected cell- can be dormant  Preventions and treatment Vaccines: Live vaccines (attenuated) Very effective but a little bit more dangerous Non-live vaccines Antiviral drugs Basic science of HIV Human immunodeficiency Virus/ Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Retrovirus (reverse)= RNA genetic information is copied/transcribed into DNA of the  host cell (by reverse transcription) HIV is transmitted: Person to person through blood, semen, and vaginal fluids (also pre-ejaculate, and  breast milk) How does the immune system respond? Two lymphocytes: B-cells (bone marrow) T-cells (thymus) T-helper cells assist the T-cells stimulating them to signal the B-cells Be-cells will produce antibodies to attack the specific virus  HIV specifically attacks the T-helper cells
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Without a supply of T-helper cells, the immune system cannot work: T-helper cells do not stimulate T-cells T-cells do not signal B-cells B-cells do not produce antibodies  Blood test measures the number of functioning T-cells:
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 25

Lecture 9 - GenderandWomenStudies Lecture9 16:57 Lecture9...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online