Exam #1 Review Sheet

Exam #1 Review Sheet - Viticulture Temperate and Western...

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Viticulture Temperate and Western cultures Wine consumption falling while production rose ’94-2001 and quality rising consumption rose 4% 2001-2005 -Modern life doesn’t allow it (cars, etc.) Viticulture – the science and art of grape growing The Vine Morpology Trunk Arm or Cordon (French for “ribbon”) Canes Shoots Cluster Leaves Tendril Vineyard Site Selection Single most important aspect of grape production in New World and Old World (has been for centuries) Affects yield, quality, and long-term profitability Climate Macroclimate (Region) ---temperature, hours of sunlight, precipitation (affect grape variety grown) Low precipitation, high temperature, high elevation; temperature affects style o Don’t like it really hot in the summer Rain & humidity = disease especially at harvest (fungi and bacteria love humidity) Temperature: 50-90 degrees (window of growth) grapes begin growing at 50 degrees Degree days: April 1-October 31 High + Low Temp for day X ½ - 50 degrees Summation o Need 2500 degree days (summation) Grapes fairly low water users Rain at harvest very bad September main month to harvest in Cali (through Oct) Meso-climate – site, climate (means “middle”; smaller vineyards) Slopes drain cold air
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Grape growing is a hillside phenomenon sun doesn’t hit Earth straight; by putting grapes on a hill, it gets more direct sunlight (South facing slope) Lakes for temperature protection –Topography o Sunlight reflecting off water at the bottom of the slope hits grapes and gives more sunlight Irrigation or rain Soil mapping for chemical and physical properties Microclimate –vine area Parts of the vineyard, the interior part, etc. Terroir total natural environment of any viticultural site Idea that every piece of land is unique (unique soil, rocks, water, etc.) o Certain wines from certain regions taste and look a certain way Exists quintessentially French- no English term Components- soil, topography, macro, meso, microclimate Reflected in wine more or less from year to year Distinct wine style that cannot be duplicated o Every wine should be an expression of the place (land) Cistercians , Charlemange –People who realized the concept of terroir Debatable whether terroir is commercially important –controversial New World vs. Old World International Style –Wines that try to taste the same the world over Modern winemaking –sameness is diminished and heightens terroir French study many soil types: 1. Low, but not deficient fertility 2. Barely sufficient water 3. Good drainage Clays have higher organics or calcium (good pore space) Soil depths Sandy, deep (Medoc) Clays (Pomerol) Burgundy – middle slopes France, Germany – Topography Maximize yield try to get as much sun on leaves as possible Irrigation
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Still, place, soil chemistry, traces elements, etc., mold the infinite variety and
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Exam #1 Review Sheet - Viticulture Temperate and Western...

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