Project 1-final paper

Project 1-final paper - Communication and Self-Concept COM...

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Communication and Self-Concept COM 134 Group Project 1 September 15, 2010 Group #26 Jamie Riedford Kasey Rose Sanam Sahni Will Reilly Evan Reinhardt
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Our very first identification of self is through our interactions with people. As children, our interaction with parents, relatives, siblings, and peers begins to shape what we think about ourselves. Whether through direct definition, where the interpersonal perception is spoken to us, or what we perceive others think of us, interpersonal perception has a huge impact on what we think of ourselves from an early age. While early interactions can have a lasting effect, interpersonal communication is a continuous process. It can be an interaction with a long time friend or someone we just met; we are constantly surrounded by communication and interaction with other people. Through these interactions we continue to see how we as individuals develop, and the geography of Self Concept is one that is always changing, for better or for worse. These interactions have a direct correlation with our self-esteem and how we view ourselves. When others repeat what they say about us and when we hear them from credible sources, our sense of self continues to become more legitimate and defined. Self-esteem is a psychological term that is said to be the most fundamental role in psychological health. It is also believed that a high self-esteem is the key to happiness and success. This is because self-esteem is the evaluation of who you are as an individual. Self-esteem is your confidence level as well as your feeling of self worth. A high self-esteem may give you the feeling that you can surmount every obstacle and accomplish any goal. A low self-esteem could be a damper on your hopes and dreams, leading you to believe that you cannot achieve that which you set your
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mind to. Those with a low self-esteem do not feel in charge of their own lives. Although self-esteem is an opinion of yourself and not how others perceive you, it is shaped by the events and encounters of your everyday life. Your self-esteem includes how you compare yourself to whom or what surrounds you, this is called social comparison. Social comparison is the rating of ourselves relative to others with respect to our talents, abilities, qualities and so forth. This means that we use others to evaluate ourselves, which relates to our level of self-esteem. Through social comparison, there are two ways that we rate ourselves in relation to others. The first way we rate ourselves is by comparing ourselves to others to decide whether we are like them or different from them. Doing so allows us to decide whom we fit in with, because past research has shown that we are usually more comfortable with those like us. As in Kasey’s case study, she stated that the rating of herself had lowered when comparing her intellect and college decisions to her friends. Associating ourselves with those like us deprives us of diverse perspectives from those with different backgrounds,
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This note was uploaded on 02/02/2012 for the course COM 134 taught by Professor Frymier during the Fall '08 term at Miami University.

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Project 1-final paper - Communication and Self-Concept COM...

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