Collaborative Media Project-FINAL PAPER

Collaborative Media Project-FINAL PAPER - Does the medias...

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“Does the media’s portrayal of war, through movies, accurately inform society about the conflict in the Middle East?” Jamie Riedford Vincent Perry Chris Stammer December 7, 2010 Does the media’s portrayal of war, through movies, accurately inform society about the conflict in the Middle East?
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The conflict in the Middle East started during the Gulf War, which lasted from August 2, 1990 to February 28, 1991. The United States has stayed involved in issues in the Middle East throughout the years, our involvement continuing as a patriotic movement following the events of September 11, 2001. Many films have been made to help explain these various issues in the Middle East to the public. We believe that society is influenced and informed in more detail by watching movies about the current conflict in the Middle East. The audience is often informed through different mediums; however, movies have the ability of providing our society with a dramatic visual of the conflict. Unlike radio and television, movies show uncensored violence, emotional story lines and heroic and dramatic war scenes. However, with the conflict dragging on we believe that society continues to be ill informed about the current events of war. By using the five stages of the critical process we will explain how movies portray a much more in depth depiction of the war, which ultimately informs and affects society’s views. Description The first film, Green Zone , is the story of the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) conspiracy in Baghdad. In the beginning of the movie, Chief Warrant Officer Roy Miller (played by Matt Damon) invades a warehouse believed to be housing WMDs, only to find the warehouse is empty. Later in a debriefing with other officials, Miller brings up that the majority of information given to him in inaccurate and anonymous. On his last three missions to find WMDs his team found nothing, but higher-ranked officials dismiss Miller’s opinions. After the meeting, Miller meets Martin Brown (played by Brendan Gleeson), a CIA Baghdad bureau chief, who tells him that the next place he will be told to look for WMDs will also be empty. At a later investigation site, an Iraqi man tells Miller that he saw VIPs meeting in a nearby house. After raiding the house they capture a man with information, who is quickly taken by Special Forces sent by Clark Poundstone (played by Greg Kinnear), who is the Pentagon Special Intelligence in Baghdad. After visiting the informant in prison, Miller and Brown figure out that Poundstone is lying; he knew all along that there were no WMDs in Baghdad, and continued to lie to his superiors in Washington so that Iraq would be invaded. When 2
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confronting Poundstone, he tells Miller that WMDs do not matter. At the end of the movie, Miller sends a copy of his written up report to all major news agencies around the world. Black Hawk Down
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This note was uploaded on 02/02/2012 for the course COM 143 taught by Professor Becker during the Fall '08 term at Miami University.

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Collaborative Media Project-FINAL PAPER - Does the medias...

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