Hitler - History1003 Exam3 HowHitlerCametoPower

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History 1003 Exam 3 How Hitler Came to Power Hindenburg and conservatives decide to trust Hitler to break the left Hitler sworn in as Reich Chancellor, January 31 1933 Reichstag Fire, Feb. 27 1933 Enabling Act, March 23 1933 Laws can be made by the cabinet w/o the assent of the Reichstag How Hitler Survived 1933-5, pt. 1 The Sticks: Repression and violence Shutting down the free press Reichstag Fire and the destruction of parliamentary politics Gestapo (political police) actions: Imprisonment of political enemies SA (Sturm Abteilung) actions: Racial violence and economic harassment The Carrots: Social policies for Aryans Winterhilfe Charity to those who needed help in the winter The Labor Front Strength Through Joy
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Heroization of veterans, Alte Kampfer, mothers, peasants Re-armament How Hitler Survived, pt. 2 Rohm Putsch (Night of the Long Knives; June 30, 1934) Use of Hindenberg’s presidency Nuremberg Rallies Early Anti-Semitic Legislation April 1933: Boycott on Jewish shops (not very successful) April 7: Law for the Restoration of the Civil Service Aryanizes govt. jobs April-Oct. 1933: Jews thrown out of many professions: journalism,  doctors/dentists employed by the state Nuremberg Laws, 1935 Who is a Jew? Racial, not religious definition Definition of who is a Jew:  1 Jewish grandparent = Mischling, 1 st  degree 2 Jewish grandparents = Mischling, 2 nd  degree 3 or 4 Jewish grandparents = Jew Nazism Triumphat, 1935-38 Anti-Jewish policy now accelerates: Nuremberg Laws Aryans, Non-Aryans, and Mischlinge Reichskristallnacht (Nov. 9, 1938)
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Kristallnacht, November 9, 1938 First full-scale, state-ordered violence against Jews 7,500 Jewish shops, 200 synagougs Hitlers Other Victims: T-4 Euthanasia campaign against ‘life unworthy of living’: the mentally and physically  handicapped Between 75,000 and 250,00 murdered before 1939 Stopped b/c of public protests in summer 1939 Persecution and sterilization of: Persons of mixed race Roma (gysies); at least 200,000 die under Nazi regime ‘Asocials’: vagrants, criminals, alcoholics, homosexuals, prostitutes Hitler’s Demands, 1936-39 German need for ‘Lebensraum’ (living space) Ending of demilitarization, ending of reparations, end of ‘war guilt’ Restitution to Germany of areas taken away by the Versailles Treaty and heavily  populated by Germany: Alsace-Lorraine, Sudetenland; destruction of the ‘Polish  Corridor’ Unification of Germany and Austria (Anschluss) Anschluss The Big Germany solution, again Hitler peacefully annexes Austria, March 1938 On the whole, greeted enthusiastically by the Austrians Annexing the Sudetenland: Appeasement
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This note was uploaded on 02/02/2012 for the course HIST 1003 taught by Professor Zucker during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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Hitler - History1003 Exam3 HowHitlerCametoPower

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