chapter 10

chapter 10 - Chapter 10 Essential Minerals Classifying...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 10 Essential Minerals Classifying Minerals Classification of minerals Macrominerals Microminerals Function Coenzymes for many functions Structural Growth Macrominerals vs. Microminerals Macrominerals (Require 100 mg or more per day) Calcium Phosphorus Sodium Potassium Chloride Magnesium Microminerals (Require less than 100 mg per day) Iron Zinc Copper Selenium Iodine Fluoride Chromium Manganese Boron Molybdenum Cobalt Vanadium So Chl oe Mag netized P.P, the Ca t? Macrominerals Calcium Most abundant mineral in the body 1.5 % of total body weight Bone (99% of body calcium) Muscle contraction Nerves function Importance of calcium and vitamin D in osteoporosis prevention Blood clotting Osteoporosis Bone turnover or remodeling To maintain a positive calcium balance Consume up to 4 servings per day from the milk and dairy group Participate in weight-bearing exercise such walking, running, jumping etc. Regulation of Serum Calcium Depends on: 1. Rate of calcium absorption 2. Parathyroid hormone (PTH): increases release from bones 3. Vitamin D Certain natural compounds can inhibit absorption of calcium Fiber Phytate Oxalate Bone cells that dissolve calcium Bone turnover Phytate Oxalate To increase calcium absorption: Spread intake throughout the day Enhanced gut absorption Presence of lactose in the gut may also increase absorption. Calcium Sources Food sources Dairy Sardines Green vegetables Spinach Supplements Calcium carbonate: better absorbed in acidic medium may be contaminated w aluminum and lead Calcium citrate Phosphorus Second most abundant mineral in the body Found in bones and soft tissue Excess may decrease blood calcium => Major source in young adult diet? Food Sources: Meat Fish Poultry Eggs Milk and milk products Cereals Legumes Grains Tea Coffee Chocolate Soft drinks => Widespread, deficiency is rare Role of Phosphorus in the Body Bone and teeth Enzyme support DNA and RNA Blood buffer ATP ATP Magnesium...
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chapter 10 - Chapter 10 Essential Minerals Classifying...

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