Anthony Corrado- National Party Comms in Elections

Anthony Corrado- National Party Comms in Elections - Party...

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Party Money in the 2006 Election www.CFInst.org ©2007 The Campaign Finance Institute Party Money in the 2006 Elections: The Role of National Party Committees in Financing Congressional Campaigns A CFI Report By Anthony Corrado and Katie Varney The Campaign Finance Institute is a non-partisan, non-profit institute, affiliated with The George Washington University, which conducts objective research and education, empanels task forces and makes recommendations for policy change in the field of campaign finance. Statements of the Campaign Finance Institute and its Task Forces do not necessarily reflect the views of CFI’s Trustees or financial supporters. Campaign Finance Institute 1990 M Street NW, Suite 380 Washington, DC 20036 202-969-8890 www.CampaignFinanceInstitute.org
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Party Money in the 2006 Election www.CFInst.org ©2007 The Campaign Finance Institute Table of Contents An Overview of Party Fundraising …………………………………………. 2 Sources of Funding ……………………………………………………………………… 6 Small Donors ………………………………………………………………………………. 6 Large Donors ………………………………………………………………………………. 8 Members’ Contributions to Party Committees ……………………………. 11 Party Expenditures …………………………………………………………………………. 15 Party Comparisons ………………………………………………………………………. 16 Key Races ……………………………………………………………………………………. 17 Parties Compared to Candidates ………………………………………………… 18 Looking Ahead to 2008 ........................................................ 21 About the Authors ……………………………………………………………………………… 24 Notes ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 24
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Party Money in the 2006 Election www.CFInst.org ©2007 The Campaign Finance Institute he 2006 elections were the first midterm elections since the adoption of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (BCRA). Because BCRA prohibited the national parties from raising or spending unrestricted soft money funds, 1 the party committees would have to finance their operations solely with hard money donations subject to federal contribution limits. In 2004, the first elections under BCRA, the parties demonstrated a remarkable capacity to adapt to the new law, raising as much in hard money alone as they had raised in hard and soft money combined four years earlier. But whether they could repeat their success in 2006 was an open question at the start of the midterm cycle. The parties typically collect less hard money in midterm cycles than in presidential years, since they lack the stimulus of a White House contest to spur individual contributions. Moreover, 2002 would be a tough standard to meet. That year the parties emphasized soft money
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Anthony Corrado- National Party Comms in Elections - Party...

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