Mill, John Stuart--Considerations on Representative Government EXCERPT

Mill John - CONSIDERATIONS ON REPRESENTATIVE GOVERNMENT BY JOHN STUART MILL CHAPTER II The Criterion of a Good Form of Government CHAPTER V Of the

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: CONSIDERATIONS ON REPRESENTATIVE GOVERNMENT BY JOHN STUART MILL, CHAPTER II. The Criterion of a Good Form of Government. CHAPTER V. Of the Proper Functions of Representative Bodies. CHAPTER VII. Of True and False Democracy; Representation of All, and Representation of the Majority Only. Chapter II The Criterion of a Good Form of Government. The form of government for any given country being (within certain definite conditions) amenable to choice, it is now to be considered by what test the choice should be directed; what are the distinctive characteristics of the form of government best fitted to promote the interests of any given society. Before entering into this inquiry, it may seem necessary to decide what are the proper functions of government; for, government altogether being only a means, the eligibility of the means must depend on their adaptation to the end. But this mode of stating the problem gives less aid to its investigation than might be supposed, and does not even bring the whole of the question into view. For, in the first place, the proper functions of a government are not a fixed thing, but different in different states of society; much more extensive in a backward than in an advanced state. And, secondly, the character of a government or set of political institutions can not be sufficiently estimated while we confine our attention to the legitimate sphere of governmental functions; for, though the goodness of a government is necessarily circumscribed within that sphere, its badness unhappily is not. Every kind and degree of evil of which mankind are susceptible may be inflicted on them by their government, and none of the good which social existence is capable of can be any further realized than as the constitution of the government is compatible with, and allows scope for, its attainment. Not to speak of indirect effects, the direct meddling of the public authorities has no necessary limits but those of human life, and the influence of government on the well-being of society can be considered or estimated in reference to nothing less than the whole of the interests of humanity. Being thus obliged to place before ourselves, as the test of good and bad government, so complex an object as the aggregate interests of society, we would willingly attempt some kind of classification of those interests, which, bringing them before the mind in definite groups, might give indication of the qualities by which a form of government is fitted to promote those various interests respectively. It would be a great facility if we could say the good of society consists of such and such elements; one of these elements requires such conditions, another such others; the government, then, which unites in the greatest degree all these conditions, must be the best....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/02/2012 for the course 790 374 taught by Professor Mcfall during the Spring '09 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 34

Mill John - CONSIDERATIONS ON REPRESENTATIVE GOVERNMENT BY JOHN STUART MILL CHAPTER II The Criterion of a Good Form of Government CHAPTER V Of the

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online