06D-1 - The Commonsense View ATTITUDE BEHAVIOR AN...

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ATTITUDE BEHAVIOR BEHAVIOR ATTITUDE The Commonsense View AN ALTERNATIVE POSSIBILITY We must justify our actions to ourselves - we do so by bringing our beliefs and feelings into line with our conduct
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HISTORICAL ANECDOTES “For whatever a man’s (sic) actions are, such must his spirit be” Demosthenes circa 350 B.C.
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HISTORICAL ANECDOTES Franklin’s way to win a friend - get him to do something nice for you
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HISTORICAL ANECDOTES Douglass’ way to “win” contempt - have someone treat you like a slave
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Explaining the Phenomenon: Festinger’s Theory of Cognitive Dissonance When we hold conflicting cognitions (e.g., when our behavior is not consistent with our attitudes), internal tension (dissonance) is aroused Attitude Behavior COGNITIVE DISSONANCE
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Explaining the Phenomenon: Festinger’s Theory of Cognitive Dissonance When we can’t change our behavior or attribute it to some external factor, we justify our behavior by changing our attitude to be more consistent with the behavior Behavior COGNITIVE DISSONANCE Attitude
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I like Jim! I just did something really BAD to him! COGNITIVE DISSONANCE
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COGNITIVE DISSONANCE Jim’s not such a great guy - in fact, he’s kind of a pain in the #%!
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Testing Cognitive Dissonance Theory The boring knob-turning task The “favor” - Ss voluntarily engage in counterattitudinal advocacy The “reward” - sufficient ($20)or insufficient ($1) justification Who would show a more favorable attitude toward the task - those paid $1 or those paid $20 to lie?
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The Results -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 Mean rating of task (-5 very boring to +5 very interesting) CONTROL $20 $1
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Counterattitudinal Advocacy and Attitude Change: Self-justification and Cognitive
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06D-1 - The Commonsense View ATTITUDE BEHAVIOR AN...

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