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CAWP Congress Facts 8.22.10

CAWP Congress Facts 8.22.10 - CAWP Fact Sheet Center for...

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Unformatted text preview: CAWP Fact Sheet Center for American Women and Politics - Eagleton Institute of Politics - Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 191 Ryders Lane - New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8557 . (732) 932-9384 . Fax (732) 932-6778 - www.cawp.rutgers.edu WOMEN IN THE U.S. CONGRESS 2010 Women currently hold 90, or 16.8%, of the 535 seats in the 1 1 1th U.S. Congress — 17, or 17.0%, of the 100 seats in the Senate and 73, or 16.8%, of the 435 seats in the House of Representatives. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), the first woman to serve as Speaker of the House, holds the highest position in the House and is second in the presidential line of succession. In addition, three women serve as Delegates to the House from Guam, the Virgin Islands and Washington, DC. (For more information about women in leadership roles in Congress, see "Women in Congress: Leadership Roles and Committee Chairs.") The seventeen (13D, 4R) women currently serving in the Senate are: Years elected (e), won special Years elected (e), won election (se), or appointed (a) special election (se),or Name Name appointed (a) Barbara Boxer (D-CA) e 1992, 1998, 2004 Blanche Lincoln (D-AR) e 1998, 2004 Maria Cantwell (D-WA) e 2000, 2006 Claire McCaskill (D-MO) e 2006 Susan Collins (R-ME) e 1996, 2002, 2008 Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) e 1986, 1992, 1998, 2004 Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) se 1992; e 1994, 2000, 2006 Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) a 2002; e 2004 Kirsten E. Gillibrand (D-NY) a 2009 Fatty Murray (D-WA) e 1992, 1998, 2004 Kay Hagan (D-NC) e 2008 Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) e 2008 Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX) se 1993; e 2000, 2006 Olympia Snowe (R-ME) e 1994, 2000, 2006 Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) e 2006 Debbie Stabenow (D-Ml) e 2000, 2006 Mary Landrieu (D-LA) e 1996, 2002, 2008 (For more detailed information, see CAWP's fact sheet on Women in the U.S. Senate.) Seventy-three women from 31 states serve in the House of Representatives; 56 are Democrats and 17 are Republicans. In addition, three Democratic women serve as Delegates to the House from Guam, the Virgin Islands and Washington, DC. (For details, see CAWP's fact sheet on Women in the U.S. House of Representatives.) Of the 90 women serving in Congress in 2010, 21, or 23.3%, are women of color — 12 African American women, 3 Asian Pacific Islanders, and six Latinas, all in the House.* A total of 252 (167D, 85R) women have served in the U.S. Congress to date: 31 (19D, 12R) in the Senate only, 213 (142D, 71 R) in the House only, and eight — Barbara Boxer (D-CA), Maria Cantwell (D-WA), Kirsten E. Gillibrand (D-NY), Blanche Lincoln (D-AR), Margaret Chase Smith (R-ME), Barbara Mikulski (D-MD), Olympia Snowe (R-ME), and Debbie Stabenow (D-Ml) — in both the House and the Senate. In addition, 4 (3D, 1R) women have served as Delegates to the House. California has sent more women to Congress than any other state — a total of 32 to date. Four states (Delaware, Iowa, Mississippi, and Vermont) have never sent a woman to either the Senate or the House. The first woman elected to the House of Representatives was Jeannette Rankin (R-MT), who served from 1917 to 1919 and again from 1941 to 1942. The first woman to serve in the Senate was Rebecca Latimer Felton (D-GA); appointed in 1922, she served for one day. Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R-KS) was the first woman elected to the Senate without having previously filled an unexpired Congressional term; Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) was the first Democratic woman to do so. To date, a total of 37 (35D, 2R) women of color have served in Congress, including 25 African Americans, five Asian American/Pacific Islanders, and seven Latinas.“ All but one served in the House of Representatives. Elected in 1992, Carol Moseley-Braun (D-IL) was the first African American woman to win a major party Senate nomination and the first woman of color ever to serve in the U.S. Senate; she lost her re-election bid in 1998. The first African American woman to serve in Congress was Shirley Chisholm (D-NY); elected in 1968, she served until 1983. The first Asian American/ Pacific Islander woman elected to the House was Patsy Takemoto Mink (D-Hl), who served from 1965- 1977; she was re-elected in a special election in September 1990 and served until she died on September 19, 2002. Judy Chu (D-CA), elected in a special election in July 2009, is the first Chinese-American to serve in Congress. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL), elected in a special election in August 1989 and re-elected in every general election since then, is the first Cuban American (female or male) and the first Latina woman ever elected to Congress. Lucille Roybal- Allard (D-CA), elected in 1992 and in every subsequent general election, is the first Mexican American woman to serve. Nydia Velazquez (D-NY), also elected in 1992 and in every subsequent general election, is the first Puerto Rican woman to serve. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), elected in 1998, became the first openly gay or lesbian person elected to an initial Congressional term. * In addition, Donna Christian-Christensen (D), who is Caribbean American, and Eleanor Holmes Norton (D), who is African American, serve as Delegates to the House from the Virgin Islands and Washington, DC, respectively. A note to users of our fact sheets: Please credit the Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP), National Information Bank on Women in Public Office, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers University. Additional information from Women in the United States Congress, Congressional Research Service. © COPYRIGHT 2010. Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP). 01/10 WOMEN IN THE US. CONGRESS 1 91 7-201 0 Please note: table for Congresses prior to the current one shows maximum number Of women elected or appointed to serve in that Congress at one time. Some filled out unexpired terms and some were never sworn in. CONGRESS DATES WOMEN IN SENATE WOMEN IN HOUSE TOTAL WOMEN 65th 1917-1919 0 (OD, 0R) 1 (OD, 1R) 1 (OD, 1R) 66th 1919-1921 0 (0D, 0R) 0 (0D, OR) 0 (0D, 0R) 67th 1921-1923 1 (10, OR) 3 (0D, 3R) 4 (1D, 3R) 68th 1923-1925 0 (OD, 0R) 1 (OD, 1R) 1 (OD, 1R) 69111 1925-1927 0 (0D, 0R) 3 (1 D, 2R) 3 (1 D, 2R) 70th 1927-1929 0 (00, OR) 5 (2D, 3R) 5 (2D, 3R) 71st 1929-1931 0 (0D, 0R) 9 (5D, 4R) 9 (5D, 4R) 72nd 1931-1933 1 (1D, 0R) 7 (5D, 2R) 8 (6D, 2R) 73rd 1933-1935 1 (1D, OR) 7 (4D, 3R) 8 (5D, 3R) 74111 1935-1937 2 (2D, 0R) 6 (4D, 2R) 8 (6D, 2R) 75th 1937-1939 2 (1D, 1R)1 6 (5D, 1R) 8 (6D, 2R) 76th 1939-1941 1 (1D, OR) 8 (4D, 4R) 9 (5D, 4R) 77111 1941-1943 1 (1D, OR) 9 (4D, 5R) 10 (5D, 5R) 78th 1943-1945 1 (1D, 0R) 8 (2D, 6R) 9 (3D, 6R) 79th 1945-1947 0 (0D, OR) 11 (6D, 5R) 11 (6D, 5R) 80th 1947-1949 1 (OD, 1R) 7 (3D, 4R) 8 (3D, 5R) 81st 1949-1951 1 (OD, 1R) 9 (5D, 4R) 10 (5D, 5R) 82nd 1951-1953 1 (0D, 1R) 10 (4D, 6R) 11 (4D, 7R) 83rd 1953-1955 2 (00, 2R) 11 (5D, 6R)2 13 (5D, 8R)2 84th 1955-1957 1 (OD, 1R) 16 (10D, 6R)2 17 (10D, 7R)2 85th 1957-1959 1 (0D, 1R) 15 (9D, 6R) 16 (9D, 7R) 86th 1959-1961 2 (1D, 1R) 17 (9D, 8R) 19 (10D, 9R) 87th 1961-1963 2 (1D, 1R) 18 (11D, 7R) 20 (12D, 8R) 88th 1963-1965 2 (1D, 1R) 12 (6D, 6R) 14 (7D, 7R) 89th 1965-1967 2 (1D, 1R) 11 (7D, 4R) 13 (8D, 5R) 90111 1967-1969 1 (0D, 1R) 11 (6D, 5R) 12 (6D, 6R) 91st 1969-1971 1 (00, 1R) 10 (6D, 4R) 11 (6D, 5R) 92nd 1971-1973 2 (1D, 1R) 13 (10D, 3R) 15 (11D, 4R) 93111 1973-1975 0 (0D, OR) 16 (14D, 2R) 16 (14D, 2R) 94th 1975-1977 0 (00, OR) 19 (14D, 5R) 19 (14D, 5R) 95th 1977-1979 2 (2D, OR) 18 (13D, 5R) 20 (15D, 5R) 96th 1979-1981 1 (OD, 1R) 16 (11D, 5R) 17 (11D, 6R) 97111 1981-1983 2 (OD, 2R) 21 (11D, 10R) 23 (11D, 12R) 98th 1983-1985 2 (0D, 2R) 22 (13D, 9R) 24 (13D, 11R) 991h 1985-1987 2 (00, 2R) 23 (12D, 11R) 25 (12D, 13R) 100111 1987-1989 2 (1D, 1R) 23 (12D, 11R) 25 (13D, 12R) 101st 1989-1991 2 (1D, 1R) 29 (16D, 13R) 31 (17D,14R) 102nd 1991-1993 4 (30, 1R)3 28 (19D, SR)“ 32 (22D, 10R)‘ 103rd 1993-1995 7 (5D, 2R)5 47 (35D, 12R)4 54 (40D, 14R)4 104111 1995-1997 9 (5D, 4R)6 48 (31D, 17R)4 57 (36D, 21R)‘ 105111 1997-1999 9 (6D, SR) 54 (37D, 17R)7 63 (43D, 20R)7 106111 1999-2001 9 (6D, 3R) 56 (39D, 17R)‘3 65 (45D, 20R)Ii 107111 2001-2003 13 (90, 4R)° 59 (41D, 18ng 73 (51D, 22R)9 108111 2003-2005 14 (9D, 5R) 60 (39D, 21R)10 74 (48D, 26R)1° 109111 2005-2007 14 (9D, 5R) 68 (43D, 25R)11 82 (52D, 30R)11 110") 2007-2009 16 (11D, SR) 72 (52D, 20R)12 88 (63D, 25R)12 111th 2009-2011 17 (13D, 4R)13 73 (56D, 17R)” 90 (69D, 21R)13 I I total 0' tIiree '25, In) women servea In the Senate In tlie 75th Congress, BUT no more tlian tWO servea togetlier at any one tIme. Fan: 0' the time two Democrats sen/ed together, and part Of the time one Democrat and one Republican served together. Does not include a Republican Delegate to the House from pre—statehood Hawaii. On election day in 1992, three women served in the Senate; two were elected and one was appointed. On November 3rd, Dianne Feinstein won a special election to complete two years of a term; she was sworn in on November 10, 1992. Does not include a Democratic Delegate to the House from Washington, DC. Includes Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX), who won a special election on June 5, 1993 to serve out the remaining year and one half of a term. Includes Sheila Frahm (R-KS), who was appointed on June 1 1, 1996 to fill a vacancy caused by resignation. She was defeated in her primary race to complete the full term. Does not include two Democratic Delegates from the Virgin Islands and Washington, DC. Also does not include Susan Molinari (R-NY) who resigned 8/1/97. Includes 4 women (2 Democrats and 2 Republicans) who won special elections in March, April, and June 1998. Does not include two Democratic Delegates from the Virgin Islands and Washington, DC. House figure does not include two Democratic Delegates from the Virgin Islands and Washington, DC; Patsy Takemoto Mink (D-HI), who died on September 19, 2002. Senate figure does not include Jean Carnahan (D—MO) who stepped down on November 23, 2002. Does include Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), who was appointed to fill a Senate vacancy on December 20, 2002. 10 Does not include three Democratic Delegates from Guam, the Virgin Islands and Washington, DC. Does include Stephanie Herseth (D-SD), who won a special election June 1, 2004 to fill a vacancy. 1 1 Does not include three Democratic Delegates from Guam, the Virgin Islands and Washington, DC. Does include Juanita Millender—McDonald (D-CA), who died on April 22, 2007. 12 Includes all current women House members, but does not include three Democratic Delegates from Guam, the Virgin Islands and Washington, DC. Does not include Stephanie Tubbs Jones who passed away, but includes Marcia Fudge who won a special election to replace her. 13 Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) moved from the House to the Senate when she was appointed on January 26, 2009 to fill a vacancy. Does not include Hillary Rodham Clinton, who was sworn in but resigned 1/16/09; Hilda Solis, who was sworn in but resigned on 2/17/09; and Ellen Tauscher, who resigned 6/26/09. Does include Judy Chu, who won a special election 7/14/09. © COPYRIGHT 2010. Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP). 01/10 mwmnwi—\m1—mi¢mimmioi-Im-.wpu 0101-1: (ION \l ‘00) ...
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