preface - Physical Geology An introductory laboratory...

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i Physical Geology An introductory laboratory manual for students in GY 111 Dr. Doug Haywick with contributions from Murlene Clark and David Allison Department of Earth Sciences, University of South Alabama Third Edition: Revised October 2007©
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ii Preface This is a newly updated version of the laboratory manual for Physical Geology. It contains material pertaining to minerals, rocks, structural geology and geological map interpretation, all of which are covered in GY 111 and GY 111L. The original lab manual was written in 1994 to address a concern that geology faculty had for many years: the cost of higher education. Traditional geology laboratory manuals (the ones with glossy photographs and spiral bindings) are expensive. They have to be as they are expected to make a profit for the author(s) and/or the publisher. To make as much money as possible, the lab manuals must also be generalized for use at any institution in the country. Consequently, most of the glossy geology lab manuals contain material that we simply do not teach at the University of South Alabama. Case studies and examples frequently deal with areas that are remote to those of us that live in the "Deep South". While it is important that undergraduate students recognize that geology is everywhere on and in our planet (other planets too!), some concepts are best illustrated by using local examples. For example, Mobile is underlain by sedimentary rocks, so isn't it better to talk about the geological materials on which our houses are built than a similar environment in California? Perhaps the worst problem with the lab manuals that we have used in the past is that they commonly employ rock names and terms that differ from the ones used in your textbook or taught in lectures. This is confusing for everyone, including your humble instructors. Figure shows the Paleozoic world during the time of the dinosaurs. The components of the future North American continent are highlighted. The figure is modified from Scotese, C.R. 1995. Phanerozoic Plate Tectonic Reconstructions, PALEOMAP Progress Report #36, University of Texas, Arlington
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iii Thus was born this economical version of a GY 111 lab manual. Throughout the text, you will find important terms highlighted in bold text . They are well worth knowing for the lab component of GY 111. Most are defined in the glossary section of your lecture textbook or on faculty web pages, or they will be discussed in lab sessions. You will also find a series of questions and exercises at the end of most of the chapters. The questions are designed to test your understanding of the concepts addressed in each section of the course. Your instructor will inform you which if any of these that you are responsible for in each laboratory session. You are advised to do
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preface - Physical Geology An introductory laboratory...

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