375 ppt #2

375 ppt #2 - The American Criminal Court System...

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The American Criminal Court System
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Jurisdiction involves the legal authority of a court to hear a case Jurisdiction is conferred by statutory or constitutional law Four primary types of jurisdiction: personal, subject matter, geographic, and hierarchical
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Personal jurisdiction: Subject matter Jurisdiction Geographic jurisdiction Hierarchical jurisdiction
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Personal jurisdiction : involves the authority of a court over the person Subject matter jurisdiction : involves the authority conferred on a court to hear a particular type of case Geographic jurisdiction : refers to the authority of courts to hear cases that arise within specified boundaries, such as a city, county, state or country. It also referred to as venue Sometimes a defendant may ask for a change of venue
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Hierarchical Jurisdiction : involves the division of responsibilities and functions among various courts General jurisdiction : means a court has the authority to hear a variety of cases Limited jurisdiction : means that a court is limited to hearing only a particular class of cases.
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Original jurisdiction : mean the power of the court to hear the case initially Appellate jurisdiction : means the power of the court to review a decision of a lower court
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Federal Courts Two court systems in the United States. Court systems of the fifty states, and the federal court system Jurisdictions of the federal and state courts frequently overlap when a crime in a state may also be punishable under federal law
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The federal court system today consists of three primary tiers: District courts Intermediate appellate courts Supreme Court
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District Courts District court is the trial court or court of original jurisdiction for the federal system In each district there is a United States District Court Within each district court there are subordinate judicial officers referred to as magistrates
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District courts conduct trials for all federal criminal offenses and have jurisdiction to hear civil cases in which there is a diversity of citizenship between the parties Diversity of citizenship refers to situations in which the opposing partiers are from different states
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Courts of Appeal Federal courts of appeal , also referred to as circuit courts Appeals heard by three judge panels which is constantly changing If conflicting decisions involve the same legal issue between two panels the entire circuit may sit en banc (as a group) and rehear the case
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Supreme Court Court of last resort Original jurisdiction over a small number of situations
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2012 for the course CJ 375 taught by Professor Jimcluphf during the Spring '12 term at Boise State.

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375 ppt #2 - The American Criminal Court System...

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